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I have this interface:

public interface IDeck<T extends IDeck<T,S>,S extends ICard<S>> extends Comparable<T>, Collection<S>{
    public Set<S> getDeck();
    public void setDeck(Set<S> newDeck);
}

And I then make a class implement it, here is the header and the first few methods:

public class PlayingCardDeck implements IDeck<PlayingCardDeck,PlayingCard> {

    @Override
    public int compareTo(PlayingCardDeck o) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return 0;
    }

Good so far, I want it to be comparable.

    @Override
    public boolean add(PlayingCard e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return false;
    }

Yup, it can contain PlayingCards

    @Override
    public boolean addAll(Collection<? extends PlayingCard> c) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return false;
    }

This is Ok I think, so long as the collection element extends PlayingCard, though this doesn't match the add(PlayingCard e) method.

    @Override
    public boolean contains(Object o) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return false;
    }

Hang on? Why is the type here Object and not PlayingCard ?

public Object[] toArray() {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    return null;
}

So any array has to be of Objects, not PlayingCards?

Why am I getting 'weird' functions implemented from my interface, and not the generics I supplied? What have I missed?

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Because Collection.contains(Object) has Object as its parameter. It's not defined as Collection.contains(E). As for why that is, you can find a detailed explanation here.

share|improve this answer
1  
I always wondered if there is anyone out there, just one person, who actually used this behaviour to do a good thing. Because there obviously is a lot of people who find it irritating. – Slanec Jun 18 '13 at 19:49
    
@Slanec The more I read of that answer and the comments, the more I think this exists for backwards compatibility. – Daniel Kaplan Jun 18 '13 at 19:54
3  
+1 and it's not for backward compatibility. contains, remove, etc. take Object because equals takes Object and their contracts delegate to the equals contract. – Paul Bellora Jun 18 '13 at 20:38
    
The issue isn't just that they delegate to the equals contract, but rather that there is nothing inherently wrong about asking a collection of Cat whether it contains something that may or may not be a Cat. If the thing in question isn't a Cat, the collection can simply reply "No, I don't contain that". – supercat Dec 19 '13 at 22:58

Because public Object[] toArray() is declared in the interface java.util.Collection, and is not generic. As well as contains(Object o). They are declared that way (non-generic) in the interface you implement.

share|improve this answer
    
I think here you could actually replace it with public PlayingCard[] to Array() using covariant return types. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Jun 18 '13 at 19:31
    
@TomHawtin-tackline care to explain? – Pureferret Jun 18 '13 at 19:37
2  
@Pureferret You can tighten the return type of an implemented/overridden method (from J2SE 5.0). PlayingCard[] is a subtype (specialisation) of Object[], although it shouldn't really be so. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Jun 18 '13 at 19:39

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