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I've got a div being used as a container for 3 other divs. These are all lined up horizontally, using float:left. I need the left and right divs to keep their same fixed width of 40px. I want the middle div to expand dynamically - using only CSS if possible.

Here is a JSFiddle I'm experimenting with: http://jsfiddle.net/xJB9n/

If you update the width of my .middle CSS class to 620px, this is the result I'm looking for, where the middle div is expanded as much as it can, while keeping itself horizontally aligned with the other two divs.

No matter the width of container I want the middle div to always expand to 100% of the area that's left, and setting:

width: 100%;

does not do the trick. Does anyone know of a way to accomplish this?

share|improve this question
    
Can you change the (order) of the markup? And what browsers do you need to support? – Jeroen Jun 18 '13 at 19:48
    
The order could change, I suppose. Do you mean placing the left and right divs together? They should still display in the order I've got them though. And all (major) browsers if possible. – lhan Jun 18 '13 at 19:51
    
I mean for example this solution, where the floating elements come first, and the final "middle" div takes up the rest of the space with auto width (and margins so it doesn't overlap the floating sidebars). – Jeroen Jun 18 '13 at 19:52
    
Your solution is exactly what I needed! Thanks - feel free to post as the answer. – lhan Jun 18 '13 at 19:54
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you can change the markup, this may work:

<div class="container">
    <div class="left"></div>  
    <div class="right"></div>
    <div class="middle"></div>
</div>

With the following CSS:

.middle {
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0 40px;
}  

.left {
    width: 40px;
    float: left;
}

.right {
    width: 40px;
    float: right;
}

See this fiddle.


Alternatively you can use absolute positioning, though this can be a pain in IE7 and below. This does allow you to keep DOM order though.

<div class="container">
    <div class="left"></div>  
    <div class="middle"></div>
    <div class="right"></div>
</div>

With this (relevant) CSS:

.container { position: relative; }

.left  { position: absolute; left: 0;  top: 0; }
.right { position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; }

.middle { margin: 0 40px; }

See this fiddle for a demo.

share|improve this answer
1  
This problem is similar to the following: stackoverflow.com/questions/17064731/… – Marc Audet Jun 18 '13 at 20:25
    
Thanks @MarcAudet that link provides a good explanation! – lhan Jun 19 '13 at 13:29

Don't know if you can use flexbox, but the following works on Chrome, Firefox, and Safari.

.container
{
    height: 100px;
    width: 700px;
    border: 1px solid black;
    display: box;
    display: -moz-box;
    display: -webkit-box;
}

.left, .right
{
    height: 100%;
    width: 40px;
    background-color: red;
    -moz-box-flex: none;
    -webkit-box-flex: none;
    box-flex: none;
}

.middle
{
    background-color: blue;
    height: 100%;
    -moz-box-flex: 1;
    -webkit-box-flex: 1;
    box-flex: 1;
}

You can see the fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/sx2Sg/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I like this, but I'd need it to work in IE. – lhan Jun 18 '13 at 20:21
    
IE10 I believe supports flex box, so if you are just looking at modern browsers, you could probably add the -ms prefix to your css. – Alex Jun 18 '13 at 20:24

In addtion to the css of @Jeroen you need to add one more thing:

html, body {
    height: 100%;
}

.middle {
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0 40px;
}  

.left {
    width: 40px;
    float: left;
}

.right {
    width: 40px;
    float: right;
}

The thing I added is to actually set the height to 100%. Without the parent elements' height set 100% you can't apply height 100% to child elements.

See this fiddle for demo.

share|improve this answer

From your structure. 2 options:

  1. display:table
  2. display:flex

display:table works fine for all browsers, including IE8. Display:flex is still growing and is not yet mature and many browser has difficulties with it . I propose then only display:table; http://jsfiddle.net/xJB9n/1/

Don't mistake, it's only CSS, you have no <table> in your markup.

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