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The doubly-linked list upon which I have based a fair amount of code appears to have a bug in it related to the way that I go about deleting nodes from the list, but I am unable to spot it. Consider the following code:

typedef struct DL_LIST
{
    uint16 tag;
    struct DL_LIST *previous;
    struct DL_LIST *next;
    void *object;
    uint32 size;
} DL_LIST;

The function used to delete nodes is as follows:

void dl_delete(DL_LIST *node, void (*destructor)(void*))
{
    assert(destructor != NULL);

    if (node != NULL)
    {
        dl_extract(node);

        if (node->object != NULL)
        {
            destructor(node->object);
        }

        free(node);
    }
}

where:

DL_LIST *dl_extract(DL_LIST *node)
{
    if (node != NULL)
    {
        if (node->previous != NULL)
        {
            node->previous->next = node->next;
        }

        if (node->next != NULL)
        {
            node->next->previous = node->previous;
        }

        node->previous = NULL;
        node->next = NULL;
    }

    return node;
}

Is anyone able to spot the problem with the way I am deleting nodes? The reason I believe that there is a problem is that I have used DL_LIST as the basis for a queue structure, and the function used to delete items from the queue corrupts it, except when I comment out the call to dl_delete.

EDIT 1. As requested in the comments, the queue code follows:

typedef struct QU_LIST
{
    DL_LIST *list;
    uint32 count;
} QU_LIST;

uint8 qu_remove(QU_LIST *queue, void *object, void (*destructor)(void*))
{
    uint8 result = QU_SUCCESS;
    uint32 size;
    DL_LIST *first_node;
    DL_LIST *next_node;
    void *marker;

    assert(queue != NULL && destructor != NULL);

    if (queue->count > 0)
    {
        first_node = dl_get_first(queue->list);
        next_node = dl_get_next(first_node);

        marker = dl_get_object(first_node, NULL, &size);

        if (marker != NULL)
        {
            if (object != NULL)
            {
                memcpy(object, marker, size);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            result = QU_NO_MEMORY;
        }

        queue->list = next_node;

        dl_delete(first_node, destructor); // this is the problem

        --queue->count;
    }
    else
    {
        result = QU_EMPTY;
    }

    return result;
}

where:

DL_LIST *dl_get_first(DL_LIST *list)
{
    if (list != NULL)
    {
        while (list->previous != NULL)
        {
            list = list->previous;
        }
    }

    return list;
}

DL_LIST *dl_get_next(DL_LIST *node)
{
    if (node != NULL)
    {
        node = node->next;
    }

    return node;
}

void *dl_get_object(DL_LIST *node, uint16 *tag, uint32 *size)
{
    void *marker = NULL;

    if (node != NULL)
    {
        if (tag != NULL)
        {
            *tag = node->tag;
        }

        if (size != NULL)
        {
            *size = node->size;
        }

        marker = node->object;
    }

    return marker;
}

EDIT 2. Thanks to a sterling answer on the part of Wumpus Q. Wumbley, the source of the problem has been narrowed down to the following code, which is part of a navigation button library for an embedded system.

void bu_test(void)
{
    QU_LIST button_list = {0};
    BU_OBJECT *object = NULL;

    object = bu_create("O");
    // object->identifier is "O" at this point.

    bu_add(&button_list, "N");
    bu_add(&button_list, "S");
    bu_add(&button_list, "E");
    bu_add(&button_list, "W");

    qu_remove(&button_list, object, (void(*)(void*)) &_destructor);
    // object->identifier should be "N" at this point, but is not.
}

where:

typedef struct BU_OBJECT
{
    char *identifier;
} BU_OBJECT;

uint8 bu_add(QU_LIST *queue, char *identifier)
{
    uint8 result = BU_SUCCESS;
    BU_OBJECT* object;

    assert(queue != NULL && identifier != NULL);

    object = bu_create(identifier);

    if (object != NULL)
    {
        result = qu_add(queue, _TAG, object, sizeof(*object));

        if (result == QU_NO_MEMORY)
        {
            _destructor(object);

            result = BU_NO_MEMORY;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        result = BU_NO_MEMORY;
    }

    return result;
}

and:

BU_OBJECT *bu_create(char *identifier)
{
    BU_OBJECT *object = NULL;
    char *p;

    assert(identifier != NULL);

    object = malloc(sizeof(*object));

    if (object != NULL)
    {
        p = malloc(sizeof(*identifier));

        if (p != NULL)
        {
            strcpy(p, identifier);
            object->identifier = p;
        }
        else
        {
            free(object);
            object = NULL;
        }
    }

    return object;
}

and finally:

void _destructor(BU_OBJECT *object)
{  
    free(object->identifier);
    free(object);
}

Objects are added to the button_list without error, but it appears that _destructor is destroying the object parameter that is passed to the function qu_remove, which seems extremely strange to me, as it should be the object of the first_node that is destroyed, not that of the parameter.

share|improve this question
1  
I read it didn't spot any bugs. Post some more – Wumpus Q. Wumbley Jun 18 '13 at 21:56
    
Code looks fine to me too. Assuming all the pointers (next, previous, and object) are either valid or NULL, should be fine. – Zenilogix Jun 18 '13 at 22:04
1  
The most delicate part seems to be the memcpy. Are you sure the second argument to qu_remove is pointing to a big enough memory area? – Wumpus Q. Wumbley Jun 18 '13 at 22:16
    
@Wumpus Fairly sure. The qu_remove function is called from yet another function that creates a local object, and then passes a pointer to that object to qu_remove. – RBE Jun 18 '13 at 22:27
1  
If there is a memory corruption issue, you might want to use valgrind or some other memory debugging tool to help you isolate it further. – jxh Jun 19 '13 at 0:12

Here's a complete program which uses your functions (all that you posted so far) exactly as they are. It works. The bug is in the part you aren't showing.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <assert.h>

typedef uint8_t uint8;
typedef uint16_t uint16;
typedef uint32_t uint32;
enum { QU_SUCCESS, QU_NO_MEMORY, QU_EMPTY };

typedef struct DL_LIST
{
    uint16 tag;
    struct DL_LIST *previous;
    struct DL_LIST *next;
    void *object;
    uint32 size;
} DL_LIST;

DL_LIST *dl_extract(DL_LIST *node)
{
    if (node != NULL)
    {
        if (node->previous != NULL)
        {
            node->previous->next = node->next;
        }

        if (node->next != NULL)
        {
            node->next->previous = node->previous;
        }

        node->previous = NULL;
        node->next = NULL;
    }

    return node;
}

void dl_delete(DL_LIST *node, void (*destructor)(void*))
{
    assert(destructor != NULL);

    if (node != NULL)
    {
        dl_extract(node);

        if (node->object != NULL)
        {
            destructor(node->object);
        }

        free(node);
    }
}

DL_LIST *dl_get_first(DL_LIST *list)
{
    if (list != NULL)
    {
        while (list->previous != NULL)
        {
            list = list->previous;
        }
    }

    return list;
}

DL_LIST *dl_get_next(DL_LIST *node)
{
    if (node != NULL)
    {
        node = node->next;
    }

    return node;
}

void *dl_get_object(DL_LIST *node, uint16 *tag, uint32 *size)
{
    void *marker = NULL;

    if (node != NULL)
    {
        if (tag != NULL)
        {
            *tag = node->tag;
        }

        if (size != NULL)
        {
            *size = node->size;
        }

        marker = node->object;
    }

    return marker;
}

typedef struct QU_LIST
{
    DL_LIST *list;
    uint32 count;
} QU_LIST;

uint8 qu_remove(QU_LIST *queue, void *object, void (*destructor)(void*))
{
    uint8 result = QU_SUCCESS;
    uint32 size;
    DL_LIST *first_node;
    DL_LIST *next_node;
    void *marker;

    assert(queue != NULL && destructor != NULL);

    if (queue->count > 0)
    {
        first_node = dl_get_first(queue->list);
        next_node = dl_get_next(first_node);

        marker = dl_get_object(first_node, NULL, &size);

        if (marker != NULL)
        {
            if (object != NULL)
            {
                memcpy(object, marker, size);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            result = QU_NO_MEMORY;
        }

        queue->list = next_node;

        dl_delete(first_node, destructor); // this is the problem

        --queue->count;
    }
    else
    {
        result = QU_EMPTY;
    }

    return result;
}

DL_LIST *dl_get_last(DL_LIST *list)
{
    if (list != NULL)
    {
        while (list->next != NULL)
        {
            list = list->next;
        }
    }

    return list;
}

DL_LIST **qu_get_tail(QU_LIST *queue)
{
    DL_LIST *node = dl_get_last(queue->list);
    if(node)
        return &node->next;
    return &queue->list;
}

uint8 qu_add(QU_LIST *queue, uint16 tag, void *object, uint32 size)
{
  DL_LIST *node = malloc(sizeof *node), *prev;
  if(!node)
    return QU_NO_MEMORY;
  node->next = NULL;
  node->tag = tag;
  node->object = object;
  node->size = size;
  if(queue->list) {
      prev = dl_get_last(queue->list);
      prev->next = node;
      node->previous = prev;
  } else {
      queue->list = node;
      node->previous = NULL;
  }
  ++queue->count;
  return QU_SUCCESS;
}

void qu_init(QU_LIST *queue)
{
    queue->list = NULL;
    queue->count = 0;
}

void destroydata(void *data)
{
    memset(data, 'X', 3);
}

int main(void)
{
    char testdata[] = "ABC DEF GHI JKL!";
    char removed[4] = "";
    int i;
    QU_LIST q;

    qu_init(&q);
    if(qu_add(&q, 0, &testdata[0], 3) != QU_SUCCESS) abort();
    if(qu_add(&q, 1, &testdata[4], 3) != QU_SUCCESS) abort();
    if(qu_add(&q, 2, &testdata[8], 3) != QU_SUCCESS) abort();
    if(qu_add(&q, 3, &testdata[12], 3) != QU_SUCCESS) abort();
    puts("Done adding");
    for(i=0;i<4;++i) {
      if(qu_remove(&q, removed, destroydata) !=QU_SUCCESS) abort();
      printf("Removed: %s\n", removed);
      printf("testdata now contains: %s\n", testdata);
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Superb answer - thank you for taking the time to have a play. I am currently yelling at my computer, trying to locate the source of the problem in the code that is not shown. If all else fails, I will append it to the end of my question. Thanks again. – RBE Jun 19 '13 at 1:07
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have found the problem. It lies not with the code, but with my understanding of it. To illustrate, consider the following line from the function qu_remove:

memcpy(object, marker, &size);

Prior to the call to memcpy, the content of object and marker in qu_remove are as follows:

Location      Content       Location Description
--------      -------       --------------------
0x1FFF8658    0x1FFF8668    Pointer to object (object)
0x1FFF8668    "O"           Pointer to identifier

0x1FFF86B0    0x1FFF8688    Pointer to object (marker)
0x1FFF8688    "N"           Pointer to identifier

After the call to memcpy, the content of object is as follows:

Location      Content       Location Description
--------      -------       --------------------
0x1FFF8658    0x1FFF8688    Pointer to object (marker)
0x1FFF8688    "N"           Pointer to identifier

For some reason I thought that memcpy would of copied the character "N" from location 0x1FFF8688 (the location of the identifier in marker) to 0x1FFF8668 (the location of the identifier in object). I now see that this is nonsense. The character "N" is not part of marker, and is therefore not copied - only the pointer to "N" is copied.

Knowing this explains the failure of the bu_test function. The tricky bit will be figuring out a way to solve the problem. What I will need is to write a replacement for memcpy that follows any pointer chains right down to the object that is being pointed-to, and copies that as well.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for posting a detailed explanation of the problem for others. Don't be a denvercoder! :p – Thomas Jun 20 '13 at 0:24

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