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I have a WCF RESTful (i.e. JSON) service I'm building in C#. One of the DataContract methods can return a response that is very large, minimum 10 MB and maximum could be over 30 MB. It's all text and it returns it as JSON data to the client. When I test this method in the browser, I see it timing out. I understand there is a way to compress WCF RESTful service response data. Since interoperability is absolutely critical for my purposes, is it still possible to compress WCF RESTful service response data? Right now, I'm still testing the project on a local machine. I will be deploying it to IIS, however.

If there is a way to compress with interoperability, how can this be done?

Thank you.

This is not actually the set of files I'm using, but it's just a sample to show how I'm constructing my services. I realize this sample would not need compression at all.

IService1.cs:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Runtime.Serialization;
using System.ServiceModel;
using System.ServiceModel.Web;
using System.Text;

namespace WcfService4
{
    // NOTE: You can use the "Rename" command on the "Refactor" menu to change the interface name "IService1" in both code and config file together.
    [ServiceContract]
    public interface IService1
    {
        [OperationContract]
        [WebInvoke(
            Method = "GET", 
            UriTemplate = "employees",
            RequestFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json,
            ResponseFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json,
            BodyStyle = WebMessageBodyStyle.Bare)]
        List<Employee> GetEmployees();
    }

    // Use a data contract as illustrated in the sample below to add composite types to service operations.
    [DataContract]
    public class Employee
    {
        [DataMember]
        public string FirstName { get; set; }

        [DataMember]
        public string LastName { get; set; }

        [DataMember]
        public int Age { get; set; }

        public Employee(string firstName, string lastName, int age)
        {
            this.FirstName = firstName;
            this.LastName = lastName;
            this.Age = age;
        }
    }
}

Service1.svc.cs:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Runtime.Serialization;
using System.ServiceModel;
using System.ServiceModel.Web;
using System.Text;
using System.Net;

namespace WcfService4
{
    // NOTE: You can use the "Rename" command on the "Refactor" menu to change the class name "Service1" in code, svc and config file together.
    public class Service1 : IService1
    {
        public List<Employee> GetEmployees()
        {
            // In reality, I'm calling the data from an external datasource, returning data to the client that exceeds 10 MB and can reach an upper limit of at least 30 MB.               

            List<Employee> employee = new List<Employee>();
            employee.Add(new Employee("John", "Smith", 28));
            employee.Add(new Employee("Jane", "Fonda", 42));
            employee.Add(new Employee("Brett", "Hume", 56));

            return employee;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

you can change your web.config file to solve this problem. change httpRuntime

<httpRuntime maxRequestLength="10240" executionTimeout="1000" />

here,

maxRequestLength: Indicates the maximum file upload size supported by ASP.NET. This limit can be used to prevent denial of service attacks caused by users posting large files to the server. The size specified is in kilobytes. The default is 4096 KB (4 MB).

executionTimeout: Indicates the maximum number of seconds that a request is allowed to execute before being automatically shut down by ASP.NET.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. When you say in the web.config file, do you mean the web.config file in my project or the web.config file of IIS? – user717236 Jun 19 '13 at 15:48
1  
web.config file of your project – Rayhan.iit.du Jun 19 '13 at 15:58

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