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I'm implementing a little program in C which uses a shared library called "libhelper.so". The "libhelper.so" defines a struct in it's h-file, but sadly depending on the target-system those definitions are different (libhelper.so is always provided by the system and not by myself):

System A:

struct theStruct {
        int fd;
        unsigned int flags;
        struct config config; // only in System A
        int foo; // in both systems
        int bar; // only in System A
};

System B:

struct theStruct {
        int fd;
        unsigned int flags;
        int foo; // in both systems
        int foobar; // only in system B
};

In my program, I thought I just define that struct by myself like this:

struct theStruct {
        int fd;
        unsigned int flags;
        struct config config; // only in System A
        int foo; // in both systems
        int foobar; // only in system B
        int bar; // only in System A
};

As the result of a call to a function in "libhelper.so" I got an instance of "theStruct" and now I though I can just check if "theStructInstance->bar" or "theStructInstance->foobar" is filled with a valid value to detect which implementation has been used by the library.

But it seems that I get just values like 1...6 which looks like the position of the field in the struct.

Has anyone an idea how I can do this?

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You do not mention how the target system is designated and how the functions in libhelper.so are used. The question is also whether there are other structs and defines and other things that depend on the target system. Could you provide additional information about that? –  Richard Chambers Jun 18 '13 at 22:43
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The reason why your proposal won't work is that the offset to the foo member is different for System A and System B. You say that you can only figure out what System you are using at runtime. So, when System B sets foo, it will likely end up setting something inside of config instead.

enum system { SystemUnknown, SystemA, SystemB };

struct theStructSystemA {
        int fd;
        unsigned int flags;
        struct config config; // only in System A
        int foo; // in both systems
        int bar; // only in System A
};

struct theStructSystemB {
        int fd;
        unsigned int flags;
        int foo;
        int foobar;
};

struct myStruct {
        union {
            struct theStructSystemA a;
            struct theStructSystemB b;
        } u;
        enum system sys;
};

struct myStruct s = { 0 };

Now, you can set bar to some invalid value: s.u.a.bar = -1, for example. Now, when you call into your library, you can check:

s.u.a.bar = -1;
some_libhelper_call((void *)&s);
if (s.u.a.bar != -1) s.sys = SystemA;
else s.sys = SystemB;

So now, after s.sys is known, you can switch to a different code path that deals entirely with a known system version.

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Thank you very much for your answer. I will try and accept your solution because it nearly exactly fits my requirements and seems to be very smart! But I wil give also +1 for every other answer because all of them are correct, good and there is a solution for every situation. Thank you all! –  Martin M. Jun 19 '13 at 6:59
    
You're very welcome. –  jxh Jun 19 '13 at 7:12
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No, this won't work.

First of all, all the definitions of the structure must be the same, otherwise you get the infamous Undefined Behaviour.

Second, look at the memory layout. What should be the offset to bar from the beginning of the structure? The first and the third definitions don't agree on this (the fields are most likely to be located consecutively).

Maybe you can try a union?

struct theStruct {
        int fd;
        unsigned int flags;
        struct config config;
        int foo; // in both systems
        union {
            int bar; // only in System A
            int foobar; // only in system B
        };
};

If you choose this, you should use only bar on System A and only foobar on System B.


If the two systems are incompatible, and the actual type needed for bar is not available on System B (and vice versa), you can do with the following code:

struct theStruct {
        int fd;
        unsigned int flags;
        struct config config;
        int foo; // in both systems
#ifdef SYSTEM_A
        int bar; // only in System A
#else
#ifdef SYSTEM_B
        int foobar; // only in system B
#else
#pragma error(either SYSTEM_A or SYSTEM_B must be enabled)
#endif
#endif
};

This way you will be always working with either with code compiled for System A or for System B, so you'll need to have different executables (which seems to be unavoidable anyway if you are compiling for the systems so much different).

You'll need to wrap parts of your code accessing the fields into #ifdefs:

#ifdef SYSTEM_A
s.bar = 5;
#endif

-- otherwise you'll get compile errors on System B.

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This particular undefined behavior is so well defined that almost every modern operating system depends critically on it. –  Wug Jun 18 '13 at 22:36
    
@Wug: writing a portable code is tricky even without UB, so I won't rely on portability of an UB anyway. –  Vlad Jun 18 '13 at 22:37
    
Thank you very much. I already thought that this will be a problem but I'm relative new to C and still learning. The union is completely new to me, have to read the docs about that and keep searching for a way around the whole situation :) –  Martin M. Jun 18 '13 at 22:38
    
@Martin: hope this advice helps. –  Vlad Jun 18 '13 at 22:40
    
You can usually use compiler directives to make the behavior defined. GCC for example includes options to explicitly control the layout of members in a struct. These being POD types greatly simplifies things. It's not only something that works in practice, but it's widely used in practice. You might recall if you've ever used WinAPI that many objects include their own sizes as members (an explicit mechanism to differentiate between arguments of different types). –  Wug Jun 18 '13 at 22:43
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Another possible solution would be to write platform dependent code to handle each of the individual structs, and then load their data into a common struct. This would then allow you to deal with the same members of the struct, no matter the code path, rather than always referencing one of the two union members based on the system:

struct mystruct;
mystruct.member1 = theStruct.member1; //the common part of the struct
mystruct.member2 = theStruct.member2;
#ifdef platform1
  mystruct.member3 = theStruct.p1member; //specific to platform1
  mystruct.member4 = -1;
#else
  mystruct.member3 = -1; 
  mystruct.member4 = theStruct.p2member; //specific to platform2
#endif
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Thanks for your answer. That was my first suggest, but sadly I haven't got the information of the target-system at compile-time, so ifdef is problematic here :) –  Martin M. Jun 18 '13 at 22:57
    
@MartinM.: Why don't you know the target system at compile time? Are you running the same binary file on multiple target systems? –  jxh Jun 18 '13 at 23:13
    
@Martin: You have to have this information. When you are compiling for platform #1, make platform1 defined (there must be a compiler flag for this), the same about platform 2. Make the code non-compileable in case neither of platform1, platform2 is defined. –  Vlad Jun 18 '13 at 23:14
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Here is an approach to think about.

A bit of background about the assumptions I am making first.

It sounds like you have some function libraryFunction () that returns a pointer to a struct theStruct. However the actual layout of the struct theStruct depends on the particular system on which your application is running. In this struct is some information that you need to access. You do not specify the calling arguments or signature of the library function and if the pointer to the struct theStruct is returned as a function value or a pointer to a pointer is part of the argument list. I will assume it is a function return value.

Create a struct you define for the information that you want. Create two files each of which has a function that takes a void pointer and a pointer to your new struct and then fills in your struct with the data you want from the library supplied struct. Each of these two files will be compiled with a particular system target specified (SystemA or SystemB) so that your conversion function will interpret the struct provided by the library function depending on the target system and fill in your struct with the data you want.

file 1 for System A

// copy of the struct used in System A which is in the library header file
// put here for reference only as should be in the header file
struct theStruct {
    int fd;
    unsigned int flags;
    struct config config; // only in System A
    int foo; // in both systems
    int bar; // only in System A
};

// my struct that contains the data from struct theStruct that I want
// would be in a header file included into each of these files but here for reference
struct myConvertStruct {
   int foo;
};

void convert2SystemA (void *structPtr, struct *myStruct)
{
   myStruct->foo = ((struct theStruct *)structPtr)->foo;
}

file 2 for System B

// copy of the struct used in System B which is in the library header file
// put here for reference only as should be in the header file
struct theStruct {
    int fd;
    unsigned int flags;
    int foo; // in both systems
    int foobar; // only in system B
};

// my struct that contains the data from struct theStruct that I want
// would be in a header file included into each of these files but here for reference
struct myConvertStruct {
   int foo;
};

void convert2SystemB (void *structPtr, struct *myStruct)
{
   myStruct->foo = ((struct theStruct *)structPtr)->foo;
}

file 3 using the conversion functions

// my struct that contains the data from struct theStruct that I want
// would be in a header file included into each of these files but here for reference
struct myConvertStruct {
   int foo;
};

{
  struct myConvertStruct myStruct;
  // some function body and now we come to the library call

  if (mySystem == SystemA) {
    void *pStruct = libraryFunction (......);
    convert2SystemA (pStruct, &myStruct);
  } else if (mySystem == SystemB) {
    void *pStruct = libraryFunction (......);
    convert2SystemB (pStruct, &myStruct);
  } else {
     //  some error conditions
  }
  // now use the data that you have pulled as you want to use it

}
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