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What compression-decompression Python module should I use to build a system in which Google App Engine (Python 2.7) exchanges compressed data with an application on a Linux machine?

There are two additional constraints:

  • Both the Linux machine and GAE will be doing compression/decompression, and need to operate thread-safely;
  • I want to do everything without using file-like objects, because App Engine cannot provide conventional Python filenames for dynamic files.

I'm asking because it's not clear from documentation whether some [de]compression modules are thread-safe.

Can anyone help fill out the table of compression modules?

Thank you!

EDIT (in response to questions of abarnert):

  • RAM vs. file-like objects = App Engine does not provide a way to open a file-like object (unless the file was uploaded as part of the app). So if GAE gets compressed data from the Linux box, I don't know of a way to uncompress it if the compression module insists that I go through a file-like object. The gzip module, for example, insists on having a filename: http://docs.python.org/2/library/gzip.html

  • "Thread-safe" on linux = Application will be behind a webserver, and so separate threads will be likely be called upon to compress and/or decompress at the same time. The Linux app starts by reading a few thousand (out of many million) semi-random chunks of compressed data from disk, then uncompressing each, then altering each uncompressed chunk, then compressing the altered chunks, then sending to GAE. Right now, the app uses zlib and runs flawlessly under light load within cherrypy, but raises zlib errors as soon as requests start happening in parallel. I'll switch to nginx as soon as this compression thing gets sorted out.

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I don't know what you mean by "I want to do everything in RAM, i.e. not use file-like objects." File-like objects often are in RAM, not backed by files—e.g., that's the whole point of StringIO and friends. On top of that, on most platforms, you can create actual OS-level files that aren't actually stored on disk, so even that distinction isn't relevant. –  abarnert Jun 19 '13 at 0:02
    
Also, what kind of thread safety are you looking for here. Do you have code running in one thread that will be trying to access the decompressed stream while another thread is generating it? If so, what does the code look like? The easiest way to solve these problems is usually to just share the decompressed string/bytes (which is immutable, and therefore doesn't need to be locked) between threads; the only major downside to that is that you have to decompress the whole thing into memory, but that's already a requirement of yours anyway. –  abarnert Jun 19 '13 at 0:03
    
Finally, when you say, "It's my understanding that some methods of ensuring thread-safety, such as locks, do not work in App Engine," can you provide a link explaining what you mean? threading.Lock.acquire certainly seems to be grabbing a real lock when I test it, blocking the entire thread. Sometimes it's much slower than on a native POSIX Python, but other than that I don't know of any difference. –  abarnert Jun 19 '13 at 0:07
    
First two questions have been answered by edits to main question. Re: "Locking" on GAE... My oops. I confused (a) locking across all frontend instances with (b) locking all threads running in a single instance. I have updated the question to remove this constraint. Thank you for the prod. :-) –  Iron Pillow Jun 19 '13 at 1:00

1 Answer 1

Your question is basically meaningless, because you're misunderstanding some fundamental things and creating problems that don't exist. I tried answering in comments, but there's a limit to what you can do that way, so…


I want to do everything without using file-like objects, because App Engine cannot provide conventional Python filenames for dynamic files.

You don't need filenames, or files, for file-like objects. That's the whole idea behind file-like objects.


App Engine does not provide a way to open a file-like object (unless the file was uploaded as part of the app).

No, you are still confusing file objects and file-like objects. A file object represents an actual file on disk. GAE restricts those. A file-like object is any object with the same API—that is, an object that acts like a file, without (necessarily) actually being one. GAE does not do anything to prevent you from creating file-like objects.

--

The paradigm example of a file-like object, a StringIO.StringIO, acts like a file object, but instead of actually reading and writing a file, it reads and writes an in-memory string buffer.

So, you can open a file-like object for writing like this:

my_file_like_obj = StringIO()

Or, if you've got a buffer in memory and you want to be able to read from it like a file:

my_file_like_obj = StringIO(buffer)

However, there are many cases where Python/GAE already gives you a file-like object that you can just use as-is, without reading it into a buffer and wrapping it up in another file-like object. Many networking APIs give you back file-like objects, but not all.

For example, if you call urllib2.urlopen, the result is a file-like object; if you call urlfetch.fetch, it's not, so you'll have to use StringIO(response.content) if you need one.


So if GAE gets compressed data from the Linux box, I don't know of a way to uncompress it if the compression module insists that I go through a file-like object.

If it insists on a file-like object, give it a file-like object. Creating an actual file is one way to do it, but not the only way. If you've got a urllib2.urlopen response, just pass that. If you've got a buffer in memory, just wrap it in a StringIO. And so on.


The gzip module, for example, insists on having a filename: http://docs.python.org/2/library/gzip.html

No it doesn't. Read the documentation you linked to:

class gzip.GzipFile([filename[, mode[, compress level[, fileobj[, mtime]]]]])

Notice that there's a fileobj parameter as well as a filename parameter? And the very first line of the documentation says:

… At least one of fileobj and filename must be given a non-trivial value …

So, it doesn't insist on having a filename, unless fileobj is None. To get around that, just… don't pass None for fileobj.

Does fileobj have to be a real file object, or can it be another file-like object? Well, the very next paragraph says:

… The new class instance is based on fileobj, which can be a regular file, a StringIO object, or any other object which simulates a file.

So, there you go.


Unfortunately, Python 2.x isn't 100% consistent about what counts as a file-like object, and the documentation doesn't always make it clear. (This is cleaned up a lot in 3.x, but that doesn't do you any good if you're using GAE.)

If some API doesn't like your file-like object because it doesn't simulate enough of the API, you will find out by getting an AttributeError. For example, you may get an error saying that the object you got back from urllib2.urlopen doesn't have a seek attribute.

The workaround is simple: read it into memory and create a StringIO. In other words, justt change fileobj=my_file_obj to fileobj=StringIO(my_file_obj.read()).


Also note that a GzipFile is itself a file-like object. This is important, because it means you can chain things together—you can make a GzipFile out of a StringIO, and then make a TarFile out of a GzipFile, and so on.


"Thread-safe" on linux = Application will be behind a webserver, and so separate threads will be likely be called upon to compress and/or decompress at the same time.

That's not a problem. Again, read the documentation you linked to:

if you need to use a single LZMAFile instance from multiple threads, it is necessary to protect it with a lock.

Compressing and/or decompressing multiple independent LZMAFile instances is not a problem. It's only if you want to share the same instance across threads. And there is almost never a good reason to do so.


The Linux app starts by reading a few thousand (out of many million) semi-random chunks of compressed data from disk, then uncompressing each, then altering each uncompressed chunk, then compressing the altered chunks, then sending to GAE.

All of the compressors you're talking about are stream compressors. You cannot decompress an arbitrary chunk out of the middle of a file without compressing the file up to that point.

What that implies to me is that what you actually have is a bunch of independently-compressed chunks (whether in separate files, or concatenated together into a single file isn't clear, but doesn't really matter).

This means that you do not need to share decompressors or compressors anywhere. For example:

with lzma.LZMAFile(chunk_path) as f:
    decompressed_chunk = f.read()
new_chunk = alter(decompressed_chunk)
sio = StringIO.StringIO()
with lzma.LZMAFile(fileobj=sio) as f:
    f.write(new_chunk)
compressed_chunk = sio.getvalue()
send_to_gae(compressed_chunk)

There is nothing to share here between threads. Even if 200 threads are doing this at the same time, even if 100 of them are trying to process the same chunk file, there still won't be a problem. The only thing that needs to be sequenced is that send_to_gae at the end.


Right now, the app uses zlib and runs flawlessly under light load within cherrypy, but raises zlib errors as soon as requests start happening in parallel.

Without knowing more about your code, it's very hard to debug it, but I've got a good guess: You're doing the compression by writing to a temporary file, and rather than using the safe APIs in tempfile, you've reinvented the wheel, with unique bugs, meaning that you end up with threads overwriting each others' temporary files.


what does the comment about individual locking mean with respect to bz2

Admittedly, it's a bit confusing. All it says is:

  • Thread safety uses individual locking mechanism.

This clearly means it's thread safe, but why do you care what locking mechanism they use? And what's an "individual locking mechanism" anyway?

You can only tell by looking at the source).

What they mean is that each BZ2Compressor (and BZ2Decompressor) object has its own separate lock, so one of them can lock without affecting the others.

If you haven't dealt with threading in Python C extensions, you may not understand what this is all about. Normally, in Python, every thread needs to hold the GIL to do any work, which means only one thread can run at a time. But a C extension module can release the GIL while doing CPU-heavy work with non-Python objects (like, say, compressing a big buffer). If N threads release the GIL, up to N+1 threads can be running in parallel, meaning you get a big advantage out of that 8-core CPU of yours without running multiple processes. However, you can't touch any Python objects while the GIL is released unless you protect them with a lock.

Many modules that release the GIL for speedup create a single module lock (sometimes because it's not so easy to figure out what objects the code might touch). That means you can run one thread doing that module's stuff in parallel with threads doing other things, but not more than one thread doing that module's stuff.

But if each thread only needs to touch a single object, you can just use a different lock for each object, which means you can run as many threads as you want in parallel, as long as they're all working on different objects.

If you do try to use the same object in two threads at the same time, it won't break anything; you'll just end up with one thread waiting to acquire the lock until the other's done (which is no better or worse than waiting on the GIL).

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I am truly humbled (and edified) by the depth of your answer, abarnert. Thank you for pointing out my lapses in reading the documentation. However, I have not accepted the answer because it does not answer the central question posed, i.e. are zlib and gzip threadsafe, and what does the comment about individual locking mean with respect to bz2? –  Iron Pillow Jun 28 '13 at 19:47
    
@IronPillow: As I explained, if you're not using the same objects (zlib.Compress, gzip.GzipFile, etc.) at the same time in multiple threads, it doesn't matter if they're threadsafe. And, since there's no reason for you to share those objects at all, the question is irrelevant. –  abarnert Jun 29 '13 at 1:38
    
@IronPillow: Meanwhile, I'll edit the answer to explain what the bz2 docs seem to mean with that admittedly confusing sentence. –  abarnert Jun 29 '13 at 1:43
    
"If you're not using the same objects (zlib.Compress, gzip.GzipFile, etc.) at the same time in multiple threads, it doesn't matter if they're threadsafe." Not sure I agree. A thread-unsafe implementation would allow distinct object instances to share access to a single other object, and this could lead to a problem, no? –  Iron Pillow Jul 1 '13 at 2:01
    
@IronPillow: In theory, yes. But there's no reason for any globals in a module like zlib or gzip. Except for one special case: If you're going to release the GIL, it's not safe to touch any Python objects period unless you lock something else that guards those objects from Python, so you might have a global lock. But that's obviously thread-safe. In other words, the modules would have to be intentionally designed to screw you to have the problem you're worried about. If you want me to find the relevant source lines I can, or you can do it yourself, or just trust they aren't malicious. –  abarnert Jul 1 '13 at 23:27

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