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I have the following interface defined.

IDbContext

public interface IDbContext<T> : IDisposable where T : class
{
    DbSet<T> Set<T>();
    int SaveChanges();
}

Which is indirectly implemented by TestContext, notice TestContext derives from System.Data.Entity.DbContext.

public class TestContext: DbContext,IDbContext<Foo>
{

}

Foo is some entity

public class Foo
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

The complier throws the following errors:

The type 'T' must be a reference type in order to use it as parameter 'TEntity' in the generic type or method 'System.Data.Entity.DbSet' TestContext.cs

The type 'T' must be a reference type in order to use it as parameter 'TEntity' in the generic type or method 'System.Data.Entity.DbSet' IDbContext.cs

The constraints for type parameter 'TEntity' of method 'System.Data.Entity.DbContext.Set()' must match the constraints for type parameter 'T' of interface method 'Domain.Logic.Repositories.IDbContext.Set()'. Consider using an explicit interface implementation instead.
EntityFramework.dll

When I add the constraint to the Generic method in the IDbContext interface the errors go away:

public interface IDbContext<T> : IDisposable where T : class
{
    DbSet<T> Set<T>() where T : class;
    int SaveChanges();
}

I'm confused as to why do I need to explicitly define the constraint on the method when it's defined at the class level?


Update Based on the comments I realized the mistake I had made.

I totally overlooked the type param on DbContext.Set() method. A type parameter on a generic method is different from its classes/interfaces type param if any, therefore should be named different. In my case I had couple of issues: 1) I had generic interface with a generic typed method with the same param name. 2) The generic typed method itself was modeled after DbContext.Set(), which has its own constraints but those constraints weren't applied to the generic method itself.

I went with option 3 as provided in the answer below:

public interface IDbContext : IDisposable {
DbSet<T> Set<T>() where T : class
int SaveChanges();

}

HTH

share|improve this question
4  
Your interface causes a warning. If you looked at it, it would tell you exactly what is wrong. Next time, don't ignore warnings. –  svick Jun 19 '13 at 1:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Remove the <T> in Set<T> in DbSet<T> Set<T>() or give T a different name in Set<T> and you should be fine. Otherwise, you're defining a T that is different from the T parameter in IDbContext<T>. That's why the compiler needs the second constraint, it think it's a different T. Thus you want one of the following two options. First:

public interface IDbContext<T> : IDisposable where T : class {
    DbSet<T> Set();
    int SaveChanges();
}

or

public interface IDbContext<T> : IDisposable where T : class {
    DbSet<TEntity> Set<TEntity>() where TEntity : class;
    int SaveChanges();
}

Alternatively, remove the generic parameter from IDbContext:

public interface IDbContext : IDisposable {
    DbSet<T> Set<T>() where T : class
    int SaveChanges();
}

Based on your comments, the latter seems more geared towards your needs.

share|improve this answer
    
He could make it out T as well. –  Romoku Jun 19 '13 at 1:22
    
@Romoku: I think it would be better to just avoid the redefinition of T. It would be confusing and difficult to maintain where you can have calls like IDbContext<int>.Set<string>() not to mention having two types T in the class implementations which are unrelated. –  Chris Sinclair Jun 19 '13 at 1:28
    
@Jason: I'm trying to define the contract based on this generic method: System.Data.Entity.DbContext.Set<TEntity>(), whose signature is: public DbSet<TEntity> Set<TEntity>() where TEntity : class; Removing T makes it a different method. –  Karl Jun 19 '13 at 1:28
    
@Romoku That wouldn't work, DbSet<T> can't even be covariant, since it's a class, not an interface. –  svick Jun 19 '13 at 1:30
1  
@Karl Well, that method is generic because DbContext normally isn't limited to a single entity. So, the wrong part is most likely making your IDbContext generic. –  svick Jun 19 '13 at 1:32

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