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I just started trying to learn Ruby on another site and it has made sense so far. But this one has me confused. The goal was to get the program to display only the even numbers from 20 to 0 using "next". The tutorial showed the correct code should be next if i % 2 == 0, which makes sense, but it kept failing. When I changed the 0 to 1, it worked.

Here is the code that the tutorial showed should work and makes sense to me:

i = 20
loop do
  i -= 1
  next if i % 2 == 0   # this is the line that changed
  print "#{i}"
  break if i <= 0
end

Here is the code that the tutorial accepted as correct:

i = 20
loop do
  i -= 1
  next if i % 2 == 1   # this is the line that changed
  print "#{i}"
  break if i <= 0
end
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1  
Would you mind sharing what tutorial you are following? This is a curious example in a number of respects in terms of learning ruby. –  Peter Alfvin Jun 19 '13 at 3:10
    
codeacademy.com –  jgasko Jun 19 '13 at 4:16
1  
Please ask only one question unless they are closely related. next and mod are not related at all, except by proximity in a line of code, which isn't really enough to tie them together in a single question. –  the Tin Man Jun 19 '13 at 4:31
    
This isn't idiomatic ruby. If this is the level of tutorial on the site I suggest finding another one. Learn Ruby The Hard Way, for example is better and you can read it for free online. –  Abizern Jun 19 '13 at 7:48
    
I can't help it: (0..20).to_a.reverse_each { |n| puts "#{n}" if n.even? } –  Abizern Jun 19 '13 at 10:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

next skips the following code in the loop and go back to the beginning and start next loop. So if you want to show even numbers, you need to skip the odd ones with next if i % 2 == 1, vise versa. I wonder what tutorial you are reading...

When i becomes 0 in the loop, it meets the condition i % 2 == 0, next will execute and the break check afterwards will be skipped.

One possible change is check if i is non-negative (break otherwise) before printing it to console, which results in the following code:

i = 20
loop do
  i -= 1
  next if i % 2 == 0   # this is the line that changed
  break if i < 0
  print "#{i}"
end

To display only even numbers, you should start with i = 21, since the first loop will subtract 1 from i so you won't have chance testing i = 20:

i = 21
loop do
  i -= 1
  next if i % 2 == 1   # this is the line that changed
  print "#{i} "
  break if i <= 0
end
share|improve this answer
    
I got it now. if i % 2 == 0, it skips the next line, which is the print line. When I made it i % 2 == 1 it does not skip the print line. –  jgasko Jun 19 '13 at 20:42

I can't explain why the tutorial was written as it was. I think it wasn't written as clearly as it could have been, and it did a disservice to you by showing code that wasn't how you'd want to write it in real life. Students emulate their teachers, so by showing poorly written code as an example, they teach you to write poorly written code.

Ruby helps us express our ideas simply:

20.downto(0) do |i|
  puts i if i % 2 == 0
end

is idiomatic Ruby. It's easy to see what is happening:

  • we are starting at 20 and counting downto 0
  • |i| is Ruby's way of assigning the current value of the counter to a variable i inside the "block" of code contained in do through the end statement.
  • puts is a smart version of print that outputs the value of i to a line on the display, IF the result of dividing i by 2 is 0. % is the "modulo" operator.

Of course there are things left unsaid, such as the proper use of trailing if statements, how puts looks for trailing line-endings and supplies them, variations on assigning parameters to a block, plus WHY and WHEN we choose to use a method like downto vs. a loop. At this point at least the student would know to write it like everyone else and wouldn't have to unlearn it.

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I got it now. if i % 2 == 0, it skips the next line, which is the print line. When I made it i % 2 == 1 it does not skip the print line.

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