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I have a regex that looks like this

((1010xxx)?(\d{11}|\d{10}|\d{7})+)

Basically I want it to match

8085551234
5551234
10102338085551234

and it should fail on
1010233

This is more for validation being done on an xsd than an actual matcher.

PS. I am trying to match US telephone numbers 7 - 11 digits long with an optional 1010xxx at the front. Also if it is 1010xxx it should not pass. xxx is any 3 digits.

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1  
So you’re just having problems with the xxx? –  Gumbo Nov 11 '09 at 21:29
    
Well, 1010233 matches \d{7}. –  Bart Kiers Nov 11 '09 at 21:30
1  
Please tell us what you are trying to accomplish, not just test cases. With the info you have provided, I would say that this is the answer: (8085551234)|(5551234)|(10102338085551234) –  Peter Di Cecco Nov 11 '09 at 21:33
    
@Bart. You are right, is there any way to say that if it is 7 digits it can not start with 10 –  arinte Nov 11 '09 at 21:34
    
I am trying to match US telephone numbers 7 - 11 digits long with an optional 1010xxx at the front. Also if it is 1010xxx it should not pass. xxx is any 3 digits. –  arinte Nov 11 '09 at 21:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If all you want is to make sure that it's a 7, 10, or 11 digit string, making sure that if it's only 7 digits it doesn't start with '1010', you can use a negative lookahead assertion before your match on \d{7}, i.e.:

((\d{11}|\d{10}|(?!1010)\d{7})+)
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Yes, but for some reason 10102334 passes? –  arinte Nov 11 '09 at 21:42
    
It contains a 7-digit string. If you don't want that to match either, you can put start and end anchors at the ends of the regex, e.g. ^((\d{11}|\d{10}|(?!1010)\d{7})+)$ –  Adam Bellaire Nov 11 '09 at 21:44
    
Instead of \d{7}, if you are using the negative look behind, you should use (?<!1010)\d{3} –  Peter Di Cecco Nov 11 '09 at 21:45
    
@Peter, why? What's wrong with the look ahead? Look ahead is over-all better supported by various regex flavors, so I don't see why you'd want to use look behind here. –  Bart Kiers Nov 11 '09 at 21:47
    
Sorry, I was confused for a moment. You're solution seems correct. –  Peter Di Cecco Nov 11 '09 at 22:04

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