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another question. I have this constructor:

sub constructor {
 my $class = shift;
 my $point = {
  year => 2013,
  month = 'june',
  @_,
 };

bless $point,$class;
}

So if I instantiate that:

my $object = Exercises -> constructor (year => 2012,day => 'Monday');

What's the use of that overriden values inside the constructor? Can anyone site a good example wherein the default values inside the constructor are used?

and how do i access the hash inside the constructor?

i tried something this:

print $object -> %$point;

which is wrong, but I did that code above because when i print $object only. It says Classname=HASH(0x152d998). So I assume it's a hash.

My understanding is that I cant use variables inside because they are lexical. Am I right?

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2  
In Perl, by convention, constructors are named new (but remember TIMTOWDI). –  Xaerxess Jun 19 '13 at 6:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

and how do i access the hash inside the constructor?

Your hashref inside the constructor ($point) is the object. When you bless a reference you make it into an object.

So you can now do this:

print $point->{year};  # from inside constructor
...
print $object->{year}; # after construction

But accessing the private parts of the object isn't safe. I would suggest that you create accessors for it rather than manipulating the hash directly. E.g.

sub year {
    my $self = shift; # this is now the object
    if (@_) {
        $self->{year} = $_[0];
    }
    return $self->{year};
}

...
print $object->year(1984);
print $object->year;

What's the use of that overriden values inside the constructor? Can anyone site a good example wherein the default values inside the constructor are used?

Since you have provided default values in the constructor, those will be used if you called the constructor without any arguments.

my $object = Exercises->new;

But since you add @_ to the hashref at the end, they will override the defaults if you supply arguments to the constructor (and the hash keys correspond to the defaults).

My understanding is that I cant use variables inside because they are lexical. Am I right?

I'm not sure that I really understand your question here. You can use variables anywhere you want. You can refer to them as long as they are in scope, or you can pass variables into the constructor or some other method if you need to.

The passed-in variables are in @_ in your subroutines. Normally they get assigned to something else for readability. E.g.

my $self = shift; # this shifts from @_ implicitly
my %args = @_; # for hash args
my ($year, $month, $day) = @_;

Some additional tips

You can see the entire data structure with this:

use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper $object;

You might not be aware that you can also use modules that can help you create classes more quickly. Check out these:

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I'm still confuse on the use of the default values inside the constructor. Example the my $object = Exercises->new; YES! I have now default values, then what? what am I supposed to do with them? And the variable part, what I mean is if I declare something like my $temp = "some value"; inside the constructor, can I access it? –  Belmark Caday Jun 19 '13 at 6:58
    
And by the way, very elaborated answer. Thanks –  Belmark Caday Jun 19 '13 at 6:59
    
Default values affect the way the object is constructed. They allow you to create objects without requiring the user to provide values. After that you can use the object like you normally would, e.g. read the attribute values $object->{year}. –  stevenl Jun 19 '13 at 7:18
    
If you declare a lexical variable inside the constructor, you can only use that within the constructor and it will go out of scope after that. But you can assign the variable as an attribute in your object (e.g. $point->{value} = $temp), then you can still get access to those values after construction (e.g. $object->{value}). –  stevenl Jun 19 '13 at 7:20

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