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Refers to this guide:
http://google-styleguide.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/cppguide.xml?showone=Integer_Types#Integer_Types

Google suggest to use int in the most of time.
I try to follow this guide and the only problem is with STL containers.

For example:
1.

void SetElement(int Index, int Value)
{
    if (Index > Vector.size()) return;
    ...
}

If I use int for Index, I got a warning here.

2.

for (int i = 0; i < Vector.size(); ++i)
{
    ...
}

When it comes to loop counter, same warning.

If I declare Index or i as unsigned int then it propagates, I have to declare more variables as unsigned int and there will be no consistency.

The best way I can think is to use a cast like:
if (Index > static_cast<int>(Vector.size()) ... or
for (int i = 0; i < static_cast<int>(Vector.size()); ++i) ...
But I really don't like the casts.

Any suggested ways?

P.S.
There are more reason than that for-loop example the link gaved.
To use only signed integer I can avoid signed/unsigned warnings, castings,
and be sure every value can be negative(to be consistent),
and I can always use -1 for invalid value.

There are many cases that it mixes loop counter with some constant or struct member, etc.
If signed/unsigned is not consistent then there will always be warnings and castings,
which is annoying and meaningless.
So that's why I want to unify all the integers to be signed.

share|improve this question
    
C++11's auto and decltype sure would help on that. You should also read this article by Herb Sutter. –  Mark Garcia Jun 19 '13 at 3:57
    
Thanks. But C++11 may not be my solution right now...our project cant support that :( –  Marson Mao Jun 19 '13 at 4:24
    
What is your compiler? C++ itself does not dictate warnings. As an aside, have you tried using a 64 bit or larger integer type? There are some quirks around how int interacts with unsigned types of its size and larger... –  Yakk Jun 19 '13 at 4:28
    
I'm using visual studio 2008 as compiler. –  Marson Mao Jun 19 '13 at 5:31
1  
Is there a reason you want to follow that so-called "guide"? –  Cubbi Jun 19 '13 at 17:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Unsigned types have three characteristics, one of which is qualitatively 'good' and one of which is qualitatively 'bad':

  • They can hold twice as many values as the same-sized signed type (good)
  • The size_t version (that is, 32-bit on a 32-bit machine, 64-bit on a 64-bit machine, etc) is useful for representing memory (addresses, sizes, etc) (neutral)
  • They wrap below 0, so subtracting 1 in a loop or using -1 to represent an invalid index can cause bugs (bad.) Signed types wrap too.

The STL uses unsigned types because of the first two points above: in order to not limit the potential size of array-like classes such as vector and deque (although you have to question how often you would want 4294967296 elements in a data structure); because a negative value will never be a valid index into most data structures; and because size_t is the correct type to use for representing anything to do with memory, such as the size of a struct, and related things such as the length of a string (see below.) That's not necessarily a good reason to use it for indexes or other non-memory purposes such as a loop variable. The reason it's best practice to do so in C++ is kind of a reverse construction, because it's what's used in the containers as well as other methods, and once used the rest of the code has to match to avoid the same problem you are encountering.

You should use a signed type when the value can become negative.

You should use an unsigned type when the value cannot become negative (possibly different to 'should not'.)

You should use size_t when handling memory sizes (the result of sizeof, often things like string lengths, etc.) It is often chosen as a default unsigned type to use, because it matches the platform the code is compiled for. For example, the length of a string is size_t because a string can only ever have 0 or more elements, and there is no reason to limit a string's length method arbitrarily shorter than what can be represented on the platform, such as a 16-bit length (0-65535) on a 32-bit platform. Note (thanks commenter Morwen) std::intptr_t or std::uintptr_t which are conceptually similar - will always be the right size for your platform - and should be used for memory addresses if you want something that's not a pointer. Note 2 (thanks commenter rubenvb) that a string can only hold size_t-1 elements due to the value of npos. Details below.

This means that if you use -1 to represent an invalid value, you should use signed integers. If you use a loop to iterate backwards over your data, you should consider using a signed integer if you are not certain that the loop construct is correct (and as noted in one of the other answers, they are easy to get wrong.) IMO, you should not resort to tricks to ensure the code works - if code requires tricks, that's often a danger signal. In addition, it will be harder to understand for those following you and reading your code. Both these are reasons not to follow @Jasmin Gray's answer above.

Iterators

However, using integer-based loops to iterate over the contents of a data structure is the wrong way to do it in C++, so in a sense the argument over signed vs unsigned for loops is moot. You should use an iterator instead:

std::vector<foo> bar;
for (std::vector<foo>::const_iterator it = bar.begin(); it != bar.end(); ++it) {
  // Access using *it or it->, e.g.:
  const foo & a = *it;

When you do this, you don't need to worry about casts, signedness, etc.

Iterators can be forward (as above) or reverse, for iterating backwards. Use the same syntax of it != bar.end(), because end() signals the end of the iteration, not the end of the underlying conceptual array, tree, or other structure.

In other words, the answer to your question 'Should I use int or unsigned int when working with STL containers?' is 'Neither. Use iterators instead.' Read more about:

What's left?

If you don't use an integer type for loops, what's left? Your own values, which are dependent on your data, but which in your case include using -1 for an invalid value. This is simple. Use signed. Just be consistent.

I am a big believer in using natural types, such as enums, and signed integers fit into this. They match our conceptual expectation more closely. When your mind and the code are aligned, you are less likely to write buggy code and more likely to expressively write correct, clean code.

share|improve this answer
    
For memory, it would be better to use std::intptr_t or std::uintptr_t which are defined as always capable of holding a pointer. –  Morwenn Jun 20 '13 at 7:31
    
You're completely right. Thanks, edited. –  David M Jun 20 '13 at 7:35
1  
+1 for iterators. Also note that std::string::npos is defined in the Standard as std::string::size_type(-1). Does this mean the Standard made a mistake? I don't think so. Using some_unsigned_type(-1) is perfectly fine. Just know you will be able to store one element less than the size of the size_type. –  rubenvb Jun 20 '13 at 7:51
    
Thanks @rubenvb: I edited to mention this and refer to your comment. I had forgotten all about npos when writing this answer and hadn't considered its effect. Using some_unsigned_type(-1) is fine (I don't have any concerns about the standard!), just so long as it's deliberate, not a bug... –  David M Jun 20 '13 at 8:26
1  
Well iterators and range-based fors are of course nice, sometimes you just can't just get away with using of indexes, iterating over 2 or more containers simultaneously and stuff like that. (it can be done with iterators but with too much of additional code which actually may be less understandable). And actually the thing that is bothering me about signed/unsigned problem is that if you had loop using unsigned as index and then change it to iterate in reversed order, it will lead to non-obvious mistake. –  Predelnik May 8 '14 at 11:06

Use the type that the container returns. In this case, size_t - which is an integer type that is unsigned. (To be technical, it's std::vector<MyType>::size_type, but that's usually defined to size_t, so you're safe using size_t. unsigned is also fine)

But in general, use the right tool for the right job. Is the 'index' ever supposed to be negative? If not, don't make it signed.

By the by, you don't have to type out 'unsigned int'. 'unsigned' is shorthand for the same variable type:

int myVar1;
unsigned myVar2;

The page linked to in the original question said:

Some people, including some textbook authors, recommend using unsigned types to represent numbers that are never negative. This is intended as a form of self-documentation. However, in C, the advantages of such documentation are outweighed by the real bugs it can introduce.

It's not just self-documentation, it's use the right tool for the right job. Saying that 'unsigned variables can cause bugs so don't use unsigned variables' is silly. Signed variables can also cause bugs. So can floats (more than integers). The only guaranteed bug-free code is code that doesn't exist.

Their example of why unsigned is evil, is this loop:

for (unsigned int i = foo.Length()-1; i >= 0; --i)

I have difficulty iterating backwards over a loop, and I usually make mistakes (with signed or unsigned integers) with it. Do I subtract one from size? Do I make it greater-than-AND-equal-to 0, or just greater than? It's a sloppy situation to begin with.

So what do you do with code that you know you have problems with? You change your coding style to fix the problem, make it simpler, and make it easier to read, and make it easier to remember. There is a bug in the loop they posted. The bug is, they wanted to allow a value below zero, but they chose to make it unsigned. It's their mistake.

But here's a simple trick that makes it easier to read, remember, write, and run. With unsigned variables. Here's the intelligent thing to do (obviously, this is my opinion).

for(unsigned i = myContainer.size(); i--> 0; )
{
    std::cout << myContainer[i] << std::endl;
}

It's unsigned. It always works. No negative to the starting size. No worrying about underflows. It just works. It's just smart. Do it right, don't stop using unsigned variables because someone somewhere once said they had a mistake with a for() loop and failed to train themselves to not make the mistake.

The trick to remembering it:

  1. Set 'i' to the size. (don't worry about subtracting one)
  2. Make 'i' point to 0 like an arrow. i --> 0 (it's a combination of post-decrementing (i--) and greater-than comparison (i > 0))

It's better to teach yourself tricks to code right, then to throw away tools because you don't code right.

Which would you want to see in your code?

for(unsigned i = myContainer.size()-1; i >= 0; --i)

Or:

for(unsigned i = myContainer.size(); i--> 0; )

Not because it's less characters to type (that'd be silly), but because it's less mental clutter. It's simpler to mentally parse when skimming through code, and easier to spot mistakes.


Try the code yourself

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for fast reply, but please read the link I gave. To quote the text here: "Some people, including some textbook authors, recommend using unsigned types to represent numbers that are never negative. This is intended as a form of self-documentation. However, in C, the advantages of such documentation are outweighed by the real bugs it can introduce". –  Marson Mao Jun 19 '13 at 4:23
1  
On 64-bit machines, size_t is a 64-bit unsigned integer type, not unsigned int. On x86/64 CPUs, size_t is equivalent to unsigned long. –  user172818 Jun 19 '13 at 4:57
    
@MarsonMao You are using C++, not C. Yes, making buggy code can (surprise!) be buggy. You can make buggy code with signed or unsigned ints. That's not a reason to not use unsigned ints. In the example they give, of negative iteration, there's a simple trick to iterate properly, which I'll post in the answer. –  Jamin Grey Jun 19 '13 at 16:40
    
@user172818 I said it's "an unsigned integer type" - I didn't mean an 'unsigned int'. An unsigned long is also "an unsigned integer type". I'll try to clarify this in the answer, thanks! –  Jamin Grey Jun 19 '13 at 17:16
    
Hi, thanks for the reply. There are more reason than that for-loop example. To use only signed integer I can avoid signed/unsigned warnings, castings, and be sure every value can be negative(to be consistent), and I can always use -1 for invalid value. There are many cases that it mixes loop counter with some constant or struct member, etc. If signed/unsigned is not consistent then there will always be warnings and castings, which is annoying and meaningless. So that's why I want to unify all the integers to be signed. –  Marson Mao Jun 20 '13 at 3:33

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