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I am creating some shell script. script1 is having an if condition inside method1 for ex-

script1
method1()
{
 if [[somecondition]]
 then
     var=y
 else
     var=n
 fi
}
method2
....

....

I want to have the value of var in script2

script2
methodx()
{
 foo=$var
 if [[ $foo = [Yy] ]]
 then
     .....
     .....
 elif [[ $foo = [Nn] ]]
 then
     .....
     .....
 else
     .....
 fi
}

Both this script are being executed in another script

script3

methodA()
{
./script1
....
....
....
}

methodB()
{
 ./script2
 ....
....
....
}

How can I get the value of var from script1 to script2

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3 Answers 3

Looks like you need method1 from script1 and methodx from script2 to be defined in script3's shell. To do that, in script3 you need to source script1 and source script2, not execute them. To accomplish that, you'll probably have to refactor your code a bit, as I see method1 defined in both script1 and script3.

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I have edited the above code know it is method1 for script1 and methodA for script3. And can you give an example how to source script1 and script2 –  Ajit Nair Jun 19 '13 at 9:57
    
Exactly as I wrote in my answer: change ./script1 to source script1. –  glenn jackman Jun 19 '13 at 10:05
    
But how can i get the value for var from 'script1' to 'script2' –  Ajit Nair Jun 19 '13 at 10:17
    
call method1. That sets var –  glenn jackman Jun 19 '13 at 10:23
    
Can you give an example I am new with shell scripting –  Ajit Nair Jun 19 '13 at 11:37

You always need space inside [[ and ]]. Also, to test a pattern you can use [[ $foo =~ [Nn] ]].

In general if you want to store the text printed by a script to standard output you use varname=$(command arguments).

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Thank you I will consider it, But do you what will be the solution for my query –  Ajit Nair Jun 19 '13 at 9:58

As l0b0 says, in methodA, instead of just ./script1, you do:

foo=$( ./script1 )

you might want to put quotes around it if script1's output has spaces:

foo="$( ./script1 )"

Also, just to be safe, declare foo outside of method1 so it is global (which is the default but its always nice to see things declared. So, at the top of script3 do:

typeset foo

If you can incorporate script1 and script2 into script3, that will be faster and probably easier to maintain but there is still many times that you need to use the $( ... ) construct. In the old days, this use to be back tics:

foo=` ./script1 `

That syntax is still supported.

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