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In my perl program am using use POSIX qw( strftime ); library to perform unixtimestamp to date conversion as follows,

my $dt = strftime("%m/%d/%y", localtime($fields[0]));

Conversion is happening as expected but am getting the following error.

 Prototype mismatch: sub main::strftime ($\@;$) vs none at 
 /usr/lib/perl5/5.8.5/Exporter.pm line 67.
 at /usr/lib64/perl5/5.8.5/x86_64-linux-thread-multi/POSIX.pm line 19

Has anyone guide me what is the reason and how to get rid of it?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You either have two functions named strftime (but then you would probably have another warning too), or you used strftime before it was declared.


I always specify my imports explicitly, so I never run into the first problem.

 use Date::Format qw( );
 use POSIX        qw( strftime );
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At the top of the script I have used "use POSIX qw( strftime )" library and in the middle of the script I have used "strftime" function. –  Mari Jun 19 '13 at 9:29
    
As you said I have used "use Date::Parse; use Date::Format" libraries also.. Is it a problem? –  Mari Jun 19 '13 at 9:30
3  
If you'd put a 'use warnings' at the top of your code you'd have got a more understandable warning that strftime was being redeclared. Basically Date::Format is also exporting a method called strftime. This is why it's often good practice to use EXPORT_OK not EXPORT and force the user to say which methods they want to import. –  plusplus Jun 19 '13 at 10:05
1  
use strict and use warnings are pretty much essential everywhere. They seem annoying at first, but catch so many typos and strange errors and will save you so much time in the long run. –  plusplus Jun 19 '13 at 12:26
1  
@plusplus use warnings does not add anything; it is lexical in scope, and the redefinition occurs in Exporter, outside the scope. -w will give a redefinition warning. –  ysth Jun 19 '13 at 15:47

I have faced the same error when I used a function before its been declare/defined. Although there can be more reasons since answer is already accepted, this may help someone.

sub func1{
 func2();
}

sub func2{
}

solution was simply to move func2 before func1.

sub func2{
}

sub func1{
 func2();
}
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