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I have an interesting problem with WCF in a Windows 7 environment... it's slooooooow.

The service is self-hosted, running in a console app.

The same code running in a Vista environment runs in about 1/3 of the time.

Server config:

<system.serviceModel>
	<behaviors>
		<serviceBehaviors>
			<behavior name="Logging.Services.LoggerServiceBehavior">
				<serviceMetadata httpGetEnabled="true" />
				<serviceThrottling maxConcurrentCalls="10000" maxConcurrentSessions="1000" maxConcurrentInstances="1000" />
				<serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="true" />
				<dataContractSerializer maxItemsInObjectGraph="2147483647" />
			</behavior>
		</serviceBehaviors>
	</behaviors>
	<bindings>
		<netTcpBinding>
			<binding name="nettcp" maxBufferSize="524288" maxConnections="1000" maxReceivedMessageSize="524288">
				<security mode="None">
					<transport clientCredentialType="None" protectionLevel="None" />
					<message clientCredentialType="None" />
				</security>
			</binding>
		</netTcpBinding>
	</bindings>
	<services>
		<service behaviorConfiguration="Logging.Services.LoggerServiceBehavior" name="Logging.Services.LoggerService">
			<endpoint address="" binding="netTcpBinding" bindingConfiguration="nettcp"
			 name="tcp" contract="Logging.Services.Contracts.ILogger" />
			<host>
				<baseAddresses>
					<add baseAddress="net.tcp://localhost:8001/LoggerService" />
					<add baseAddress="http://localhost:8002/LoggerService" />
				</baseAddresses>
			</host>
		</service>
	</services>
</system.serviceModel>

Client config:

		<netTcpBinding>
			<binding name="tcp" closeTimeout="00:01:00" openTimeout="00:01:00"
			 receiveTimeout="00:10:00" sendTimeout="00:01:00" transactionFlow="false"
			 transferMode="Buffered" transactionProtocol="OleTransactions"
			 hostNameComparisonMode="StrongWildcard" listenBacklog="10" maxBufferPoolSize="524288"
			 maxBufferSize="524288" maxConnections="10" maxReceivedMessageSize="524288">
				<readerQuotas maxDepth="32" maxStringContentLength="524288" maxArrayLength="16384"
				 maxBytesPerRead="4096" maxNameTableCharCount="16384" />
				<reliableSession ordered="true" inactivityTimeout="00:10:00"
				 enabled="false" />
				<security mode="None">
					<transport clientCredentialType="Windows" protectionLevel="EncryptAndSign" />
					<message clientCredentialType="Windows" />
				</security>					
			</binding>				
		</netTcpBinding>

and

		<endpoint address="net.tcp://localhost:8001/LoggerService" binding="netTcpBinding"
		 bindingConfiguration="tcp" contract="LoggerLogService.ILogger"
		 name="tcp" />

I read somewhere that someone with a similar problem, running NOD32 had to turn HTTP Checking off, which I have done to no effect. I completely disabled NOD with no luck.

Any ideas?

Thanks in advance!

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4 Answers 4

Check out WCF Performance Counters to track down where the bottleneck might be occurring.

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Hi Mike, I am only getting 2 calls per second with a large backlog of calls outstanding. This is for a "one way" service call. Weird... –  Quoo Nov 11 '09 at 23:53
    
Sounds like something is slowing them down further upstream, perhaps. –  Mike Atlas Nov 12 '09 at 0:00

from this post try adding the following entry to the binding configuration:

useDefaultWebProxy="false"

EDIT: Since you are using netTCP, try increasing your maxConnections and maxmessagesize

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Hi Russ, the useDefaultWebProxy attribute is for HTTP based bindings only afaik. –  Quoo Nov 11 '09 at 23:47
    
ah, i guess i should pay closer attention –  Russ Bradberry Nov 11 '09 at 23:58

What is the concurrency mode set to on the service? I'm not sure how to do this through the config file, but on one of my WCF services, I added this ServiceBehaviorAttribute to my service class:

[ServiceBehavior(
    Namespace="http://blah.com/",
    InstanceContextMode = InstanceContextMode.Single, 
    ConcurrencyMode=ConcurrencyMode.Multiple)]
public class MyService : IMyServiceInterface
{
    // ...
}

If your service is already running with concurrency and things are still slow, it may be due to something in the service code itself. Although Vista is 3 times faster, that still sounds incredibly slow, depending on what the service is doing.

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Thanks Jacob, my service is also a Singleton and has a ConcurrencyMode of Multiple. I did find my problem though, see above. –  Quoo Nov 12 '09 at 0:43
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Meh... apologies guys, I was pointing my repository at my SQL server at work... Would help if I had noticed the 7MB of error logs available the entire time. Sleep deprivation is finally kicking in I think.

Thanks anyway!

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1  
consider flagging your original post for deletion, perhaps. –  Mike Atlas Nov 12 '09 at 16:07

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