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I have the following query to be executed for my project:

SELECT fcr.request_id,
             DECODE
                (fcpt.user_concurrent_program_name,
                 'Report Set', fcr.description,
                 'Request Set Stage', fcr.description,
                 fcpt.user_concurrent_program_name
                ) user_concurrent_program_name,
             fcr.description, fcr.argument_text, fcr.concurrent_program_id,
             fcr.parent_request_id, fcr.actual_start_date,
             fcr.actual_completion_date,
             ROUND (  (fcr.actual_completion_date - fcr.actual_start_date)
                    * 24
                    * 60,
                    4
                   ) runtime,
             DECODE (fcr.phase_code, 'C', 'No Schedule') program_status,
             fu.user_name, frt.responsibility_name, fcr.logfile_name
        FROM apps.fnd_concurrent_requests@db_link fcr,
             apps.fnd_concurrent_programs_tl@db_link fcpt,
             apps.fnd_user@db_link fu,
             apps.fnd_responsibility_tl@db_link frt
       WHERE fcr.concurrent_program_id = fcpt.concurrent_program_id
         AND fcr.requested_by = fu.user_id
         AND fcr.responsibility_id = frt.responsibility_id
         AND fcr.responsibility_application_id = frt.application_id
         AND fcr.actual_completion_date >= (SELECT MAX (alert_logged_time)
                                          FROM allen.main_table
                                         WHERE program_status = 'No Schedule')
         AND fcr.phase_code = 'C';

But the above query takes too long to run. When I give the corresponding time as input, instead of

SELECT MAX (alert_logged_time) 
FROM allen.main_table 
WHERE program_status = 'No Schedule'

I get the output very soon even. why is that so? Anyway to rectify this?

share|improve this question
    
Try adding an index to ALLEN.MAIN_TABLE on the columns (PROGRAM_STATUS, ALERT_LOGGED_TIME). Share and enjoy. –  Bob Jarvis Jun 19 '13 at 11:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I suspect that the reason for the discrepancy is that the original slow query has tables both remote and local, while the modified query has only remote tables.

When Oracle queries a mix of local and remote tables, it has to decide where the join will take place. If the join is to be performed locally, as it is usually preferred by default, all the data from the remote tables will be transferred over the database link. The amount of data transferred can be many times larger than the actual result of the query.

On the other hand when all tables are remote in a query, only the result of the query is transferred, while the computation takes place at the remote site.

You can use the /*+ DRIVING_SITE (<table_alias>)*/ hint to instruct Oracle to perform the join at the site of the designated table, and thus limit the amount of data that goes back and forth.

Adding the hint /*+ DRIVING_SITE(fcr) */ to your query should make it perform as your modified query.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Duh, I missed the fact that remote tables were involved. Nice thinking. Nonetheless, it would be interesting to know how mixing remote and local tables would influence scalar subquery caching, which (in my opinion) should still be applicable... –  Lukas Eder Jun 19 '13 at 10:19
    
Adding the hint, did the job. Query completed in seconds after adding the hint. So, now, does that mean the data from my local table is being carried to the remote site or only the result is being carried to the remote site? –  zephyrus Jun 19 '13 at 10:22
    
@zephyrus I think the data is filtered appropriately before being sent. In that case I would guess that only one row is sent. It should be tested though. –  Vincent Malgrat Jun 19 '13 at 12:09
    
@LukasEder I'm not sure subquery caching is involved here since the result of the subquery is not dependent upon other tables. –  Vincent Malgrat Jun 19 '13 at 12:30
    
@VincentMalgrat: Precisely. This is why the subquery (i.e. the MAX() value) should be evaluated only once for the whole "outer" query, no matter how many records are produced by the various joins –  Lukas Eder Jun 19 '13 at 12:38

Since your subquery is eligible for Oracle's scalar subquery caching feature, I suspect that the reason for slow performance could be a missing index on any (or both) of:

  • allen.main_table.program_status
  • allen.main_table.alert_logged_time
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, the table lacks index on both the columns. Might be the reason as well. –  zephyrus Jun 19 '13 at 10:25

you can try to use a join instead

SELECT fcr.request_id,
             DECODE
                (fcpt.user_concurrent_program_name,
                 'Report Set', fcr.description,
                 'Request Set Stage', fcr.description,
                 fcpt.user_concurrent_program_name
                ) user_concurrent_program_name,
             fcr.description, fcr.argument_text, fcr.concurrent_program_id,
             fcr.parent_request_id, fcr.actual_start_date,
             fcr.actual_completion_date,
             ROUND (  (fcr.actual_completion_date - fcr.actual_start_date)
                    * 24
                    * 60,
                    4
                   ) runtime,
             DECODE (fcr.phase_code, 'C', 'No Schedule') program_status,
             fu.user_name, frt.responsibility_name, fcr.logfile_name
        FROM apps.fnd_concurrent_requests@aadsp_to_acptr fcr,
             apps.fnd_concurrent_programs_tl@aadsp_to_acptr fcpt,
             apps.fnd_user@aadsp_to_acptr fu,
             apps.fnd_responsibility_tl@aadsp_to_acptr frt,
             (SELECT MAX (alert_logged_time) as max_time
              FROM allen.main_table
              WHERE program_status = 'No Schedule')  SQ
       WHERE fcr.concurrent_program_id = fcpt.concurrent_program_id
         AND fcr.requested_by = fu.user_id
         AND fcr.responsibility_id = frt.responsibility_id
         AND fcr.responsibility_application_id = frt.application_id
         AND fcr.actual_completion_date >= SQ.max_time
         AND fcr.phase_code = 'C';
share|improve this answer
    
What makes you think that a joined subquery might peform better in Oracle? It might have an effect in some databases, such as MySQL. But Oracle's CBO should be able to detect that the two queries are equivalent... –  Lukas Eder Jun 19 '13 at 9:52
1  
Actually it worked better. Previously my query was running for more than 10 mins, now after using the join it completes in less than a minute. –  zephyrus Jun 19 '13 at 10:13
    
@zephyrus: Good to know. Would be interesting to see the two execution plans, compared to each other! –  Lukas Eder Jun 19 '13 at 10:18

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