Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to plot two or more histograms from the same data, but inverting the coordinates of one group, like the following:

enter image description here

(note: this figure is taken from Grossman et al 2011, A composite of Multiple Signals Distinguishes Causal Variants in Regions of Positive Selection)

For example, let's take the diamonds dataset from ggplot2:

> library(ggplot2)
> head(diamonds)
  carat       cut color clarity depth table price    x    y    z
1  0.23     Ideal     E     SI2  61.5    55   326 3.95 3.98 2.43
2  0.21   Premium     E     SI1  59.8    61   326 3.89 3.84 2.31
3  0.23      Good     E     VS1  56.9    65   327 4.05 4.07 2.31
4  0.29   Premium     I     VS2  62.4    58   334 4.20 4.23 2.63
5  0.31      Good     J     SI2  63.3    58   335 4.34 4.35 2.75
6  0.24 Very Good     J    VVS2  62.8    57   336 3.94 3.96 2.48

One approach I have tried has been to calculate the histogram using stat_bin without plotting it, changing the values of the counts column returned by it.

> my_sb <-stat_bin(data=diamonds, mapping=aes(x=x)

The documentation of stat_bin says that this function should return a data.frame equal to the mapped one, but adding four new columns (count, density, ncount, ndensity). However, I can not find these columns anywhere:

# I supposed that this should contain a count, density columns, but it does not.
> print(head(my_sb$data))  
  carat       cut color clarity depth table price    x    y    z
1  0.23     Ideal     E     SI2  61.5    55   326 3.95 3.98 2.43
2  0.21   Premium     E     SI1  59.8    61   326 3.89 3.84 2.31
3  0.23      Good     E     VS1  56.9    65   327 4.05 4.07 2.31
4  0.29   Premium     I     VS2  62.4    58   334 4.20 4.23 2.63
5  0.31      Good     J     SI2  63.3    58   335 4.34 4.35 2.75
6  0.24 Very Good     J    VVS2  62.8    57   336 3.94 3.96 2.48

Another possible approach is to use scale_y_reverse(), but I don't know how to apply it to a single dataset.

The third approach that I can think of is to use viewPorts, but I am not quite sure on how to implement it.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Like this maybe:

ggplot(data = diamonds) + 
    geom_histogram(aes(x = x,y = ..count..)) + 
    geom_histogram(aes(x = x,y = -..count..))

FYI - I couldn't remember exactly how I'd done this in the past, so I Googled "ggplot2 inverted histogram" and clicked on the first hit, a StackOverflow question.

I'm not sure exactly how the proto object that stat_bin returns is structured, but the new variables are in there somewhere. The way this works is that geom_histogram itself calls stat_bin to perform the binning, and so it has access to the computed variables, which we can map to the y variable.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you! this is exactly what I was looking for. I had searched with google before posting, but without luck :-). –  dalloliogm Jun 20 '13 at 15:26
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.