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I'm making a unmanaged application to handle an event fired in c# here. FYI:: I want to handle a custom event when my Name property in C# class is changed. I have gone through the following links:

Explanation about passing pointer to member function as parameter

Something similar to my problem.But couldn't understand the solution

Now, In NativeApp.cpp,I have a member function which is passed as a function pointer as parameter in a method present in the c++/CLI wrapper

//NativeApp.cpp
std::string Class1::FunctionToBePointed(std::string msg)
{
   return msg;
}

void Class1::NativeMethod()
{
UnmanagedWrapperClass* unmanagedWrapperClass=new UnmanagedWrapperClass();
unmanagedWrapperClass->WrapperMethod(&Class1::FunctionToBePointed,"Hello")
}

In Wrapper.h,

//Wrapper.h
class __declspec(dllexport) UnmanagedWrapperClass
{
 boost::signals2::signal<void(std::string)>signalEvent;
 void WrapperMethod(std::string (*GetCallBack)(std::string),std::string value);

}

When I call the WrapperMethod from NativeApp.cpp,

  1. I subscribe my EventHandlerWrapper to a c# event

  2. connect the function pointer to my boost signal signalEvent.

  3. Set the Name property of the CSharp Class

    When the Name Property is set, c# event is fired, EventHandlerWrapper method in Wrapper.cpp is executed.Looks like this::

    void EventHandlerWrapper(string value)

    {
    
    if(signalEvent.connected())
    

    { signalEvent(value); }

For some reasons I can't make my FunctionToBePointed(std::string) method as a non-member function.

P.S:: All ears for any other design approach.

share|improve this question
    
@megabyte1024,While I am building my NativeApp.cpp, I am getting the above mentioned error –  gotoVoid Jun 19 '13 at 11:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your real use-case can you simply make FunctionToBePointed a static method?

static std::string Class1::FunctionToBePointed(std::string msg)
{
   return msg;
}

If yes your code should work.

The reason is that instance methods are implicitly called with an hidden this pointer, this is the thiscall calling convention, whereas static methods simply use the cdecl convention because they don't work on any instance.

EDIT:

A sample with Boost::bind:

The MyClass C# class:

using System;
using System.ComponentModel;

public class MyClass : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged = delegate{};

    private string name;
    public string Name
    {
        get
        {
            return name;
        }
        set
        {
            if (name != value)
            {
                name = value;
                PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Name"));
            }
        }
    }
}

The C++/CLI wrapper:

Wrapper.h:

class WrapperPrivateStuff;

class __declspec(dllexport) UnmanagedWrapperClass
{
    private: WrapperPrivateStuff* _private;
    public: void changeIt(std::string newName);
    public: void WrapperMethod(boost::function<std::string(std::string)> GetCallBack);
    public: UnmanagedWrapperClass();
};

Wrapper.cpp:

#using "MyClass.dll"

#include <boost/signals2.hpp>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>

#include "Wrapper.h"

#include <msclr\auto_gcroot.h>
#include <msclr\marshal_cppstd.h>
#include <msclr\event.h>

class WrapperPrivateStuff
{
    public: boost::signals2::signal<void(std::string)>signalEvent;
    public: msclr::auto_gcroot<MyClass^> a;
    public: void EventHandlerWrapper(System::Object^, System::ComponentModel::PropertyChangedEventArgs^ args)
    {
        this->signalEvent(msclr::interop::marshal_as<std::string>(a->Name));
    }
    public: WrapperPrivateStuff()
    {
        a = gcnew MyClass();
        a->PropertyChanged += MAKE_DELEGATE(System::ComponentModel::PropertyChangedEventHandler, EventHandlerWrapper);
    }

    BEGIN_DELEGATE_MAP(WrapperPrivateStuff)
        EVENT_DELEGATE_ENTRY(EventHandlerWrapper, System::Object^, System::ComponentModel::PropertyChangedEventArgs^)
    END_DELEGATE_MAP()
};

void UnmanagedWrapperClass::changeIt(std::string newName)
{
    this->_private->a->Name = msclr::interop::marshal_as<System::String^>(newName);
}

UnmanagedWrapperClass::UnmanagedWrapperClass()
{
    this->_private = new WrapperPrivateStuff();
}

void UnmanagedWrapperClass::WrapperMethod(boost::function<std::string(std::string)> GetCallBack)
{
    _private->signalEvent.connect(GetCallBack);
}

And the native application, test.cpp:

#include <iostream>

#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/function.hpp>

#include "Wrapper.h"

class Class1
{
    private: std::string name;

    public: Class1(std::string name)
        : name(name)
    {
    }

    public: std::string FunctionToBePointed(std::string msg)
    {
        std::cout << "Hey it's " << name << "! Got: " << msg << std::endl;
        return msg;
    }
};

int main(void)
{
    UnmanagedWrapperClass wrapper;
    Class1 class1("Ed");

    wrapper.WrapperMethod(boost::bind(&Class1::FunctionToBePointed, &class1, _1));
    wrapper.changeIt("azerty"); 

    return 0;
}

Result:

>test.exe
Hey it's Ed! Got: azerty

I have a more generic solution but it is really ugly. :(

Let me know if this fix your issue...

share|improve this answer
    
@Pragmateek...for some reasons, I can't make it static. I am familiar with this answer and syntax Sir.If u can provide me any other workaround, that would be more than helpful. –  gotoVoid Jun 19 '13 at 13:12
    
So I fear you can't because AFAIK pointers to functions don't carry any instance information. You'll either have to pass the object to work on as an additional parameter or use a wrapper like std::function/boost::function with binding. –  Pragmateek Jun 19 '13 at 13:29
    
how should i initialize function pointer with boost::bind... –  gotoVoid Jun 21 '13 at 6:10
    
@gotoVoid: I've edited my answer with an example. –  Pragmateek Jun 22 '13 at 16:51

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