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Scenario:

Given a set of resources R: set of resources

Given a set of threads T, which will run in parallel: set of threads

Each thread needs to access a list of n resources. Each list is a sample of R, meaning that each resource is unique within each list: threads access random samples of resources

But since the access lists are sampled randomly, there can be conflicts: conflicting access

The random resource lists will be initialized once in the beginning. After that, each thread will do an atomicAdd operation on each resource in the list, subsequently. The access order of the resources in each list is irrelevant.

Question:

Is there an algorithm which sorts the scheduling lists, so that the number of writing conflicts gets minimized? So the final result would look like this: resolved conflicts

My insights so far:

  • The random sampling is important for the context of the algorithm, so it is not an option to initialize the lists in another way (only their order may be altered).
  • The overall schedule can be viewed as a matrix S with |T| rows and n columns, where each entry is an element of R.
  • If |T| <= |R|, a solution without any conflicts is possible.
  • If |T| == |R|, the columns of an optimized scheduling matrix S are permutations of R.
  • If |T| > |R|, the average number of conccurrent accesses in an optimized scheduling matrix should be |T| / |R|

Possible approaches:

I am looking for an analytical solution for this problem. Could it be np-complete? If this is the case, I am thinking about designing a genetic algorithm to solve this problem.

Edit 1: Added diagrams.

share|improve this question
    
What is the resource? Does writing to resource x interfere at all with writing to resource y? If so, does it matter what x and y (i.e. are all resource writes mutually interfering)? Your notation is hard to understand. You say that the matrix S has |T| rows and |N| columns, and each entry is an element of R. So isn't |R|, then, the total number of elements? But if that's the case, then some of your insights don't make sense. For example, If |T| <= |R|, .... But won't |T| always be <= |R| when |N| >= 1? Yeah, confusing notation. – Jim Mischel Jun 19 '13 at 13:13
    
Thank you for your comment. The elements of the matrix S are indices of the resources, since the resources are identified by their index, I consider the set R the set of indices of the resources. So the numbers are elements of set R, though the dimensions of this matrix are |T|x|N|. I will provide some diagrams, I hope my notation makes sense then. I tried to formulate the problem as general as possible. I fear if I write about the context in which I need this, it gets even more confusing. The resources are independent, so writing to x does not interfere with writing to y. – schreon Jun 19 '13 at 14:16
    
So in simplified terms you're asking if there's an algorithm that will minimize the occurrences of the same resource in a particular column. The ideal is that a given R won't appear more than once in any column? – Jim Mischel Jun 19 '13 at 15:26
    
Exactly. But as soon as there are more threads than resources, conflicts are inevitable, but the number of conflicts for each resource can still be minimized (so, for example, instead of 5 conflicts within a column there will be only 2 in the optimized version). – schreon Jun 19 '13 at 15:38
    
I don't think "If |T| <= |R|, a solution without any conflicts is possible." is true. R = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}, N = 2, and the access lists are T1 = {1, 2}, T2 = {1, 3}, T3 = {1, 4}, T4 = {1, 5}. If we resort the lists, we can go conflictless in step 1: T1 = {1, 2}, T2 = {3, 1}, T3 = {4, 1}, T4 = {5, 1}, but a conflict will happen in step 2. I can't think of a non brute force solution, but it is an interesting problem. – svinja Jun 21 '13 at 18:04

I think the question is asking "can we sort the lists to reduce the conflicts."

I think an optimum solution is NP complete, but I would look for the number of occurances in the set for each resource.

Step 1

The most commonly used resource is the hardest one to schedule. Thus I would place in each of the threads this resource in position 1, 2, 3, 4, ... Until conflict occurs (which may be unavoidable) e.g. 1,2,3,4,..., n, 1, 2,... .

These are the "big stones". These should be placed first.

Step 2

The next most commonly used resource should then be tried. This should identify which slots (1 => n) have been used recently and search through that list for a slice which is both unallocated and not recently used.

Whichever slot is chosen, it moves to the top of the recently used queue to be avoided for a while.

This favours distributing the resource, but allows duplicates. These duplicates will become recently used, and not favoured again for scheduling until no valid choices are available.

Finally

Step 2 is repeated for each of the resources in order of their occurances.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok.. so I felt your answer was the most optimal and I even up-voted your answer. I just realized that for the resource list of {1, 2, 3} given to 4 threads, your solution at least performs worse than my solution. Mentioning it to bring your attention to the case. – displayName Aug 31 '15 at 19:52
    
If you have less resources than threads, then the ordering doesn't matter so much. I would expect the most commonly used resource to be scheduled {1, x,x }, { x, 1, x }, { x,x,1}, { 1, x, x }. then the next resource { 1, 2, x}, { 2, 1, x}, {2,x,1}, {1,x,2 } finally { 1,2,3 }, {2,1,3 }, {2,3,1}, {1,3,2} – mksteve Aug 31 '15 at 19:54
    
The task is to provide the least conflicting order. So, ordering does matter, no? :) Especially when there exists an ordering which is having lesser conflict than the solution coming from your algorithm. If even for one case the solution isn't correct, then the algorithm is wrong. – displayName Sep 1 '15 at 2:21

Formalizing problem

At first, it looks like a variant of OSSP. We need to schedule R resources over T processors. Some scheduling times are 0, some are 1.

However, we need to complete the entire sequence in n timesteps, and there are exactly n*T non-zero scheduling times.

So, we are looking for scheduling in n time, with no T-T conflicts (as no thread can operate on two resources at the same time), and with minimum number of R-R conflicts. I assume that target function to minimize is:

enter image description here

Where count is a number of threads using resource j at time i.

Constructing problem graph

Let's construct a graph G=(V,E) with vertex for every thread (first part), and every resource (second part). For every non-zero scheduling time, we have an edge from thread to resource. This graph is obviously bipartite.

Every thread vertex has a degree of n.

Our goal is to edge color this graph with n colors, in a such way that:

  • No thread vertex has two adjacent edges with the same color

  • Number of adjacent edges with the same color is minimal

Conflict free solution

If there is no resource vertex with degree d > n, then graph has a proper edge coloring with at most n colors. And proper coloring is of course the best coloring in terms of target function - there are no conflicts at all.

Bipartite graph edge coloring can be done in O(n * T * R) time.

Solution with conflicts

Now, suppose that we have a resource vertex with degree d > n. That means there is no proper edge coloring with n colors, and we will have a conflict in our schedule.

Bound on the number of conflicts.

We have some vertexes V_conflict with degree d > n. Then number of conflicts is exactly q: sum max(0, d-n)

It can't be less, as every conflicting color in edge-coloring is a conflict in our schedule, and for every vertex with degree d > n we have at least d - n conflicting colors.

Now, we want to construct a solution with exactly q conflicts. Remove any set of edges from every vertex in V_conflict to lower their degree to n. We've removed exactly q edges. Now, we have a conflict-free solution (as proper graph edge coloring in n colors).

Now insert previously removed q edges, assigning color which is not yet assigned to any edge of their corresponding thread vertex. As every added edge can only introduce 1 conflict, we now have exactly q, which is proven lower bound.

This entire step with conflicts can be done in:

  • O(R) for determining V_conflict

  • O(R*T) for removing conflicting edges

  • O(n * T * R) for solving reduced conflict-free version.

  • O(n * q) for adding the edges back to the graph

So complete solution can be achieved in O(n * T * R) time.

share|improve this answer

Approach

  1. From the resource-list of each thread we create a merged list, called CountedResourceList that stores the <resource-id, total occurrence count of that id>, in decreasing order of counts. This will take O(rt*log(rt)) time. The Why? of that is explained in the sample run below. Also in the same iteration, we create a HashMap so that we can find in O(1) time as to in which thread's list this resource-id is to be put (based on the idea of Inverted Index for those who can relate).
  2. Next, we create a matrix - called SortedListMatrix - of t rows and r columns. In this matrix we start with placing the resource-ids from CountedResourceList into that thread's row which initially contained this max occurring resource-id. This way, the resource-ids exhaust in the order of most occurring to least occurring.
  3. To help with resource-ids insertion, we also create a int[t] FreeColumnCount that keeps count of the total free columns for each thread. Since the thread with lesser free slots has less ability to move the resource-id around in case of a conflict, a resource-id will be first filled in the row that has least free slots for the threads containing that resource-id.
  4. Starting from the 0th column of the first thread that contains the highest occurring resource-id, we pick the location for next id to put using the formulae row = GetRowForResource(id) in the HashMap, and column = (column+1)%r. If the resulting column in a row is occupied, we take the next unoccupied column value by iterating using the same formula of column value, without changing the row. Therefore - columns are subject to wrapping around and rows are determined from the HashMap so that a resource-id goes in the correct list and at the least conflicting location.
  5. After this matrix has been completely populated, start with 0th row and assign the rows to each thread as their new least conflicting resource-list.

Attn: I have intermittently mentioned the complexity of few steps, but will update with the overall run-time complexity soon. For now I am trying to come up with an algorithm that is correct.


A Sample Run

Initial assumptions and definitions:

  • Number of threads = t, starting from thread 0 to t-1
  • Number of resources for each thread = r
  • Total resources to prepare the resource-list for threads will be >= r

Let's start with a case of t = 4. T0 = {4, 3, 5}, T1 = {1, 2, 6}, T2 = {3, 1, 2}, T4 = {2, 7, 1}. Now, I know that this list is not having any conflicts already. There should be a preprocessing step that finds out if there should be some re-arrangement done in the first place. Like if the lists are already having the minimum-conflicts possible OR if there are no conflicts, the lists should be returned as they are. Still, let's see the pseudocode in action.

First we read all the resources in all lists and put them in individual buckets of resource ids. Making use of Counting Sort, this will be a linear step taking O(tr + constant) time. However, since this will just give a count of resource ids, we will need to further use Merge Sort to sort the ids in the order of decreasing occurrence. This step will take O((rt) log(rt)). The result will be a list or ids sorted in decreasing order of occurrence -

CountedResourceList = <3 times, id 1>, <3 times, id 2>, <2 times, id 3>, <1 time each ids 4, 5, 6, 7>

During the same iteration, we also create the HashMap and the FreeColumnCount array.

Next, we create the SortedListMatrix which is populated starting from row = first thread to contain max occurring resource-id (by calling GetRowForResource(id)), column = 0. The matrix will initially be empty and then populated as follows:

Initially:
{_, _, _}
{_, _, _}
{_, _, _}
{_, _, _}

Taking 1st element '1' at (1, 0):
{_, _, _}
{1, _, _}
{_, _, _}
{_, _, _}  

Taking 2nd element '1' at (2, 1):
{_, _, _}
{1, _, _}
{_, 1, _}
{_, _, _} 

Taking 3rd element '1' at (3, 2):
{_, _, _}
{1, _, _}
{_, 1, _}
{_, _, 1}

Taking 4th element '2' at (1, 1) as (1, 0) is already occupied:
{_, _, _}
{1, 2, _}
{_, 1, _}
{_, _, 1}

Taking 5th element '2' at (2, 2):
{_, _, _}
{1, 2, _}
{_, 1, 2}
{_, _, 1}

Taking 6th element '2' at (3, 0):
{_, _, _}
{1, 2, _}
{_, 1, 2}
{2, _, 1}

Taking 7th element '3' at (0, 0) because row 2 has least free slots:
{_, _, _}
{1, 2, _}
{3, 1, 2}
{2, _, 1} 

Taking 8th element '3' at (0, 1):
{_, 3, _}
{1, 2, _}
{3, 1, 2}
{2, _, 1} 

Taking 9th element '4' at (0, 2):
{_, 3, 4}
{1, 2, _}
{3, 1, 2}
{2, _, 1}

Taking 10th element '5' at (0, 0):
{5, 3, 4}
{1, 2, _}
{3, 1, 2}
{2, _, 1}

Taking 11th element '6' at (1, 2):
{5, 3, 4}
{1, 2, 6}
{3, 1, 2}
{2, _, 1}

Taking 12th element '7' at (3, 1):
{5, 3, 4}
{1, 2, 6}
{3, 1, 2}
{2, 7, 1}

The run-time complexity of above step will be O(rt).

When matrix has been completely populated, T0 will be assigned row 0 as its resource-list, T1 as row 1...

share|improve this answer

I am not aware of any algorithms. One approach with the understanding that its ok to re-order the sequence would is to - have locks that represent each of the resource.

A thread while accessing a resource, obtains the corresponding lock for that resource. If another thread wants to access the same resource, then it re-schedules the access with the next one. For example T1 can access R1. If T2 also requires access to R1 then T2 can instead reschedule (swap) access for R1 with say access for R2 and then take up R1 assuming T1 is done with it.

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