Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

REPL:

scala> val a = "hello\nworld"
a: String = 
hello
world

scala> val b = """hello
     | world"""
b: String = 
hello
world

scala> a == b
res0: Boolean = true

Worksheet:

val a = "hello\nworld"                        //> a  : String = hello
                                              //| world

val b = """hello
world"""                                      //> b  : String = hello
                                              //| world

a == b                                        //> res0: Boolean = true

Normal Scala code:

val a = "hello\nworld"

val b = """hello
world"""

println(a)
println(b)
println(a == b)

Output:

hello
world
hello
world
false

Why does the comparison yield true in the REPL and in the Worksheet, but false in normal Scala code?


Interesting, b appears to be one char longer than a, so I printed the Unicode values:

println(a.map(_.toInt))
println(b.map(_.toInt))

Output:

Vector(104, 101, 108, 108, 111, 10, 119, 111, 114, 108, 100)
Vector(104, 101, 108, 108, 111, 13, 10, 119, 111, 114, 108, 100)

Does that mean multi-line string literals have platform-dependent values? I use Eclipse on Windows.

share|improve this question
1  
You must have a white space in your IDE document. Have you checked that both report length 11? You could also check with a.getBytes if there is a discrepancy. –  0__ Jun 19 '13 at 11:45
1  
Second time this week. stackoverflow.com/questions/17090537/… –  som-snytt Jun 19 '13 at 13:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I guess it's because of the source file encoding.

Try to check a.toList.length and b.toList.length. It seems b == "hello\r\nworld".

Multi-line string literal value depends not on the platform, but on the encoding of the source file. Actually you'll get exactly what you have in the source file between """. If there is \r\n you'll get it in your String.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.