Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm consuming JSON data that has a bit of a weird structure for example:

{
    "RESULT": 
    {
        "COLUMNS": ["ID","name","ENABLED","perms","vcenabled","vcvalue","checkenabled","checkvalue","indxenabled","indxvalue"],
        "DATA": [
                    [7,"Site-A", 1, "1,2", 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
                    [15,"Site-B", 1, "1,2,3,4", 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0]
        ]
    },
    "ERROR": 0
}

I would like to create some JavaScript that would restructure this data to proper JSON structures so that the "Column" array values become the keys for the "DATA" array's values. So after a JS process is run the data resembles the following:

[
  {"ID":7,"name":"Site-A","ENABLED":1,"perms":"1,2","vcenabled":1,"vcvalue":1,"checkenabled":1,"checkvalue":1,"indxenabled":1,"indxvalue":1},
  {"ID":15,"name":"Site-B","ENABLED":1,"perms":"1,2","vcenabled":1,"vcvalue":1,"checkenabled":1,"checkvalue":1,"indxenabled":1,"indxvalue":1}

]

What are the JavaScript best practices for accomplishing the JSON restructuring? Could I accomplish this task using a JS framework like JQuery, Foundation JS, ect... ?

share|improve this question
2  
you can accomplish this with a simple loop. Create an empty object, iterate through COLUMNS, get data from DATA and fill up your new object. –  claustrofob Jun 19 '13 at 13:12
    
@claustrofob: two loops for simplicity, please :-) –  Bergi Jun 19 '13 at 15:44
add comment

4 Answers

Using Underscore, it's a one-liner:

var formatted = _.map(orig.RESULT.DATA, _.partial(_.object, orig.RESULT.COLUMNS));

With plain javascript (less elegant but faster), it would be

var formatted = [],
    data = orig.RESULT.DATA,
    cols = orig.RESULT.COLUMNS,
    l = cols.length;
for (var i=0; i<data.length; i++) {
    var d = data[i],
        o = {};
    for (var j=0; j<l; j++)
        o[cols[j]] = d[j];
    formatted.push(o);
}
share|improve this answer
    
fastest way here ^ –  cocco Jun 19 '13 at 16:06
add comment

newjson is your new object, j is your json,

code is very fast as it caches the legth and don't uses push.

And as it's pure javascript it's faster than all the libraries.

var j={
 "RESULT":{
  "COLUMNS":[
   "ID",
   "name",
   "ENABLED",
   "perms",
   "vcenabled",
   "vcvalue",
   "checkenabled",
   "checkvalue",
   "indxenabled",
   "indxvalue"
  ],
  "DATA":[
   [7,"Site-A", 1, "1,2", 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
   [15,"Site-B", 1, "1,2,3,4", 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0]
  ]
 },
 "ERROR": 0
}

var newjson=[],d=j.RESULT.COLUMNS.length;
for(var a=0,b=j.RESULT.DATA.length;a<b;a++){
 for(var c=0,tmpObj={};c<d;c++){
  tmpObj[j.RESULT.COLUMNS[c]]=j.RESULT.DATA[a][c];
 }
 newjson[a]=tmpObj;
}

console.log(newjson);

based on Bergi's response u can also use the while-- loop.

var orig={
 "RESULT":{
  "COLUMNS":[
   "ID",
   "name",
   "ENABLED",
   "perms",
   "vcenabled",
   "vcvalue",
   "checkenabled",
   "checkvalue",
   "indxenabled",
   "indxvalue"
  ],
  "DATA":[
   [7,"Site-A", 1, "1,2", 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
   [15,"Site-B", 1, "1,2,3,4", 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0]
  ]
 },
 "ERROR": 0
}

var formatted = [],
data = orig.RESULT.DATA,
cols = orig.RESULT.COLUMNS,
l = cols.length,
f = data.length;

while (f--) {
  var d = data[f],
      o = {},
      g = l;
  while (g--) {
    o[cols[g]] = d[g];
  }
  formatted[f] = o;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why do you think not using push makes it better? Btw, the code is very slow as it does not cache the relevant things. –  Bergi Jun 19 '13 at 15:46
    
newjson[a]=tmpObj; is faster than newjson.push(tmpObj).and what u wanna cache? –  cocco Jun 19 '13 at 15:49
    
yeah good.. for the caching... but push is slower. –  cocco Jun 19 '13 at 15:55
    
we should try on jsperf. –  cocco Jun 19 '13 at 15:55
    
OK, if you have the index already available that will be better, but there's no relevant distinction between arr.push(x) and arr[arr.length] = x. See stackoverflow.com/q/614126 for detailed analysis - one should use what is clearer to read :-) –  Bergi Jun 19 '13 at 15:59
show 4 more comments

Try this using underscorejs.

var plain = {
    "RESULT": 
    {
        "COLUMNS": ["ID","name","ENABLED","perms","vcenabled","vcvalue","checkenabled","checkvalue","indxenabled","indxvalue"],
        "DATA": [
                [7,"Site-A", 1, "1,2", 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
                [15,"Site-B", 1, "1,2,3,4", 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0]
        ]
    },
    "ERROR": 0
}
   , formatted = [];

_.each(plain.RESULT.DATA, function(value) {
    var tmp = {};
    _.each(value, function(parameter, pos) {
        tmp[plain.RESULT.COLUMNS[pos]] = parameter;
    });
    formatted.push(tmp);
});

console.log(formatted);

http://jsfiddle.net/kxR88/

share|improve this answer
    
Why do you use slow each functions instead of for-loops? The Underscore approach looks different. –  Bergi Jun 19 '13 at 16:05
    
Yip, your underscore one-liner looks better. Nice one with the _.partial, never used this. –  cr0 Jun 19 '13 at 19:49
add comment

you can use underscore Array functions for this task

http://underscorejs.org/#arrays

uusing the object function would be helpful http://underscorejs.org/#object

from the documentation : _.object(list, [values]) Converts arrays into objects. Pass either a single list of [key, value] pairs, or a list of keys, and a list of values ..the example:

_.object(['moe', 'larry', 'curly'], [30, 40, 50]);
 => {moe: 30, larry: 40, curly: 50}

here is the JSfiddle with the solution http://jsfiddle.net/rayweb_on/kxR88/1/

and the code looks like this for this specific scenario.

 var plain = {
"RESULT": 
{
    "COLUMNS": ["ID","name","ENABLED","perms","vcenabled","vcvalue","checkenabled","checkvalue","indxenabled","indxvalue"],
    "DATA": [
                [7,"Site-A", 1, "1,2", 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
                [15,"Site-B", 1, "1,2,3,4", 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0]
    ]
},
"ERROR": 0
},

formatted = [];

_.each(plain.RESULT.DATA, function(value) {
    var tmp = {};
     tmp = _.object(plain.RESULT.COLUMNS,value)
    formatted.push(tmp);
});

 console.log(formatted);
share|improve this answer
    
Well, you really should use the appropriate array function :-) –  Bergi Jun 19 '13 at 16:05
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.