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I am using T/SQL in Microsoft SQL Server 2008 and have a user Licence table which has the following structure:

LicenceID (PK, uniqueidentifier, not null)
SupersededID (FK, uniqueidentifier, not null)
…other licence related columns

When a user upgrades their licence key, the SupersededID is populated with the original LicenceID. This can occur multiple times and there will therefore always be a trace back to the very first licence that was issued. It is also possible for a licence key to never be superseded.

The difficulty I have is that I need to be able to query all of the rows in the Licences table and extract the very first original licence key for each.

I believe this can be achieved by recursively calling a query using the WITH method, something along these lines, but I'm not totally clear on the concept.. this is what I have so far:



WITH c
     AS (SELECT SupersededByID,
                LicenceID,
                LicenceID AS topParentID
         FROM   Licence
         where SupersededBy IS NOT NULL
         UNION ALL
         SELECT l.SupersededBy,
                l.LicenceID,
                c.topparentid
         FROM   Licence AS l
                INNER JOIN c
                        ON l.id = c.SupersededByID
         WHERE  T.SupersededByID IS NOT NULL)

SELECT *
FROM   c
share|improve this question
    
Have you considered an SCD type 2 table for this? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slowly_changing_dimension#Type_II This will avoid recursion. –  gbn Jun 19 '13 at 14:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For the recursion you have to start with the root records, which are the ones with SupersededById = NULL. These give you the current licences, which you want to trace back.

So the basic recursive query goes like this:

WITH c AS
(
     SELECT SupersededById,
            LicenceId,
            LicenceId AS BaseId, 
            1 as Level
     FROM   Licence
     WHERE SupersededById IS NULL
     UNION ALL
     SELECT l.SupersededById,
            l.LicenceId,
            c.BaseId, 
            c.Level + 1 as Level
     FROM   Licence AS l
            INNER JOIN c ON l.SupersededById = c.LicenceId
)
SELECT * FROM c

This gives you all records with two additional columns: The Level column goes up every time you go back to a superseded licence. The BaseId is the constant which stays the same on a licence track.

So with that set of data you look for the record with the maximum Level for each BaseId, which can be done with a subselect:

WITH c AS
(
     SELECT SupersededById,
            LicenceId,
            LicenceId AS BaseId,
            1 as Level
     FROM   Licence
     where SupersededById ByIS NULL
     UNION ALL
     SELECT l.SupersededById,
            l.LicenceId,
            c.BaseId,
            c.Level + 1 as Level
     FROM   Licence AS l
            INNER JOIN c ON l.SupersededById = c.LicenceId
)
SELECT c1.LicenceId as OriginalLicence FROM c as c1
WHERE c1.Level = (SELECT MAX(c2.Level) FROM c as c2 WHERE c2.BaseId = c1.BaseId)

BTW: If you want additional columns from the source table, you just have to add them to all SELECTs.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the troubleshooting. So much for my trying to bang out a query in a hurry. fyi: Every time I post a recursive CTE without a MaxRecursion option the OP runs into the default recursion limit processing their real data. If nought else, it is worth suggesting. –  HABO Jun 19 '13 at 18:30
    
@HABO: I was hoping that 100 relicenses are well under what actually happens in the real world, but to Adsborough: You know what you have to do in case it's not :-) –  TToni Jun 20 '13 at 6:27
    
Thanks @TToni, however I think I'm still missing something.. When I run the query everything seems be coming at as a level 1 result (I know there are up to 4 for some licences). Shouldn't the last join be this instead? INNER JOIN c ON l.SupersededById = c.LicenceId –  Adsborough Jun 20 '13 at 9:05
    
@Adsborough: Yes you are right. The way I wrote it the second part never works out because it compares l.LicenceId to NULL which is always false. Will fix it in the answer. –  TToni Jun 20 '13 at 9:09

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