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I want to use ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY SOME_COLUMN_NAME Order By SOME_COLUMN_NAME) in select SQL.

I am using both SQLServer as well as Oracle Database.

Does this require "Partitioning feature" to be enabled on Database?

UPDATE :- i am using multiple Versions: SQL Server 2005 ,SQL Server 2008 R2 ,Oracle 11g

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Did you try using the row_number() in your select? Did it work? Did you get an error? – bluefeet Jun 19 '13 at 16:23
    
For SQL Server: No! There is not even such option to configure. Even for Oracle I don't think its "Partitioning feature" has anything to do with ROW_NUMBER – Nenad Zivkovic Jun 19 '13 at 16:24
    
@bluefeet Currently it works perfectly on my local but i am not sure of my client DB whether it has partitioning feature enabled or not. – harrybvp Jun 19 '13 at 16:25
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@harrybvp And in Oracle there is something called Partitioning feature that can be disabled or enabled, but it got nothing to do with ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY) – Nenad Zivkovic Jun 19 '13 at 16:31
6  
@Nenand sure there is - the OP is just confusing PARTITION BY and table partitioning, which of course are very different things. – Aaron Bertrand Jun 19 '13 at 16:33
up vote 5 down vote accepted

"Partitioning Feature" is totally different from OLAP functions.

So, the answer is "YES" , you can use "Row_Number" with partitioning feature disabled.

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4  
The correct (ANSI SQL) term is "window functions" not "OLAP functions" (OLAP functions is the Microsoft term, analytical function would be the Oracle term). – a_horse_with_no_name Jun 19 '13 at 17:08

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