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Is there an easy/elegant parser for dealing with JSON in C#? How about actually serializing/deserializing into C# objects?

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As an addendum to this question, can anyone state whether System.Web.Script.Serialization.JavaScriptSerializer is applicable to this question (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…)? I'm very curious. –  Crescent Fresh Nov 12 '09 at 3:53
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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

JSON.Net is a pretty good library

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JSON.Net all the way , makes working with json so much easier –  RC1140 Nov 12 '09 at 7:18
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var jss = new JavaScriptSerializer();
var data = jss.Deserialize<dynamic>(jsonString);

Don't forget to reference "System.Web.Extensions"

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See

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.runtime.serialization.json.datacontractjsonserializer.aspx

Basically you can use the 'data contract' model (that's often used for WCF XML serialization) for JSON as well. It's pretty quick and easy to use standalone for little tasks, I have found.

Also check out this sample:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb943471.aspx

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There's the DataContractJsonSerializer class.

Deserialize:

DataContractJsonSerializer ser = new DataContractJsonSerializer(typeof(MyObject));
Stream s = new MemoryStream(System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(json_string));
MyObject obj = ser.ReadObject(s) as MyObject;

Serialize:

DataContractJsonSerializer ser = new DataContractJsonSerializer(typeof(MyObject));
Stream s = new MemoryStream();
MyObject obj = new MyObject { .. set properties .. };
ser.WriteObject(s, obj);
s.Seek( SeekOrigin.Begin );
var reader = new StreamReader(s);
string json_string = reader.ReadToEnd();
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DataContractJsonSerializer for serializing to/from objects.

In Silverlight 3, there's System.Json (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.json%28VS.95%29.aspx), very handy.

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