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If we have the following XML structure:

<Tree>
  <Apple>
    <Size>6</Size>
  </Apple>
  <Apple>
    <Size>4</Size>
  </Apple>
  <Apple>
    <Size>3</Size>
  </Apple>
</Tree>

It's very easy to display the size of the next-in-line apple with something like:

<xsl:for-each select="Tree/Apple">
  <xsl:value-of select="following-sibling::*/Size">
</xsl:for-each>

But what if your tree structure is slightly more complex, with branches which may hold one or more apples:

<Tree>
  <Branch>
    <Apple>
      <Size>6</Size>
    </Apple>
  </Branch>
  <Branch>
    <Apple>
      <Size>4</Size>
    </Apple>
    <Apple>
      <Size>3</Size>
    </Apple>
  </Branch>
</Tree>

How can we be sure to always select the next-in-line apple? (6-4-3)

I understand you can achieve this by checking to see if the branch has any more apple children using conditions, and then selecting from the next branch if this is not the case. But is it possible to achieve this with just one value-of select line?

Many thanks for your help.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use the following axis, which looks for the next Apple anywhere later in the document if you use the following:

<xsl:for-each select="Tree//Apple">
  <xsl:value-of select="following::Apple[1]/Size">
</xsl:for-each>
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In general the way you "iterate through inconsistent structures" is by using xsl:apply-templates and template rules - that's what these constructs are designed for.

But as for your apples example, it rather depends what output you want.

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You may also try something like the following:

<xsl:template match="Apple">
    <xsl:copy-of select=
        "(following-sibling::Apple | ../following-sibling::*/Apple )[1]/Size"/>
</xsl:template>

This could be little more reliable if the XML grow even more complex. This will only match to "Apple on the same level but can be belong to different parents.

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