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I always thought that a "singular" iterator was one that has been default-initialised, and these could serve as comparable sentinel values of sorts:

typedef std::vector<Elem>::iterator I;
I start = I();

std::vector<Elem> container = foo();

for (I it = container.begin(), end = container.end(); it != end; ++it) {
   if ((start == I()) && bar(it)) {
      // Does something only the first time bar(it) is satisfied

      // ...

      start = it;
   }
}

But this answer suggests not only that my definition of "singular" is wrong, but also that my comparison above is totally illegal.

Is it?

share|improve this question
    
I don’t think the answer implies that your code is illegal, only that your nomenclature was wrong. It might still be illegal, mind. At the very least you failed to default-initialise start – for PODs, its value is singular (and your code illegal). –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 19 '13 at 18:23
    
@Konrad: Oops, yes, default-initialisation intended. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 19 '13 at 23:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Obviously this will work for some iterators - T* being a clear example - but it's definitely not guaranteed correct behavior for all iterators. C++11 24.2.1 [iterator.requirements.general] p5:

Singular values are not associated with any sequence ... Results of most expressions are undefined for singular values; the only exceptions are destroying an iterator that holds a singular value, the assignment of a non-singular value to an iterator that holds a singular value, and, for iterators that satisfy the DefaultConstructible requirements, using a value-initialized iterator as the source of a copy or move operation.

You can replicate your desired behavior with a simple bool flag:

std::vector<Elem> container = foo();
bool did_it_already = false;

for (I it = container.begin(), end = container.end(); it != end; ++it) {
   if (!did_it_already && bar(it)) {
      // Does something only the first time bar(it) is satisfied

      // ...

      did_it_already = true;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to find an explicit citation that says "default constructed iterators may be singular", but it doesn't seem to exist; I think it's only implicit. –  Casey Jun 19 '13 at 18:35
    
@PeteBecker The possibly-singular iterator in question (start) is compared with another default-constructed iterator, not with the end iterator of any sequence, I don't see how your comments apply. –  Casey Jun 19 '13 at 19:17
    
Never mind... <g> –  Pete Becker Jun 19 '13 at 19:19
    
Was hoping this would be a handy way to avoid that bool. Bah! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 19 '13 at 22:59
    
The standard quote seems to clearly answer my question. Thanks. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 19 '13 at 23:29

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