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So I have a select box -- that has a name but no ID -- and Firefox is not letting me change the 'selectedIndex' property.

I've tried:

$('select[name=foo]').prop('selectedIndex',1)

Also tried:

$('select[name=foo]').get(0).selectedIndex=1

Basically, anything I could possibly find relating to selectedIndex...but it refuses to change. It stays at 0. Tried this in my code, tried it in the console...it stays at 0. It works in all other browsers, though.

And the select box is dynamically generated, so I can't just stick an ID in there.

What's weird, though, is that the val() and text() properties do reflect that the option that was selected was actually selected, but the selectedIndex doesn't change, so I'm trying to force it to change.

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So this is specifically a Firefox issue, and it doesn't affect other browsers? –  Crazy Train Jun 19 '13 at 18:18
    
why do you want to set the selected indexy –  isJustMe Jun 19 '13 at 18:19
    
Yup: I've tried Chrome, Internet Exploder, Safari, and Opera, and it worked fine on all those. –  dauber Jun 19 '13 at 18:19
    
Is there anything else unusual about the element? Is it disabled or hidden or anything? –  Crazy Train Jun 19 '13 at 18:20
1  
If this is just a visual issue (which it sounds like since you say the .val() and .text() are correct), then try setting some random style property, or other various things like that. Sometimes they just need a kick to trigger a redraw. –  Crazy Train Jun 19 '13 at 18:31
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4 Answers 4

I don't know why it doesn't work, but could you do this instead, which should work:

$('select').find('option').first().next().prop('selected','selected');

To get n-th item:

index = 1;
$('select').find('option:nth-child(' + (index+1) + ')').prop('selected','selected');

Where index is the selectedIndex

Are you sure this doesn't work on firefox? Just tested it (firefox 21 on ubuntu) - http://jsfiddle.net/Wmv6q/

Perhaps you have something else on your page that is resetting it? If not, can you tell what version of firefox you are on?

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Thing is, it's not necessarily that I want the index to be 1 -- I might want it to be 2 or 3. Oh...and just for laughs, I tried that suggestion -- and...the index was still at zero. –  dauber Jun 19 '13 at 18:15
1  
You should set the selected property as true or false –  Ian Jun 19 '13 at 18:26
    
No you shouldn't. See here: jsfiddle.net/Wmv6q/1 - if the attribute is present (even set to false), it is selected. Setting it to true implies false would work to not select it. The spec says selected implies that attribute value "selected", which is why I use it, but it is also correct to just have nothing after it. Using false is definitely not correct. –  dave Jun 19 '13 at 18:31
1  
dave: You're confusing attributes and properties. The property (which you're setting) should be set as a boolean value. –  Crazy Train Jun 19 '13 at 18:32
1  
@dave Sorry, but you've already contradicted yourself. Properties are different from attributes. When setting the checked, selected, and disabled properties, you should use true/false. When setting the attributes, you should use a string. Have you ever worked with DOM methods/properties (not jQuery)? What's the result of element.checked? A boolean. What's the result of element.getAttribute("checked")? A string. Look at the jQuery docs for both .attr() and .prop() –  Ian Jun 19 '13 at 18:32
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If you know the value you can set it by that in FF pretty easily:

<select>
    <option>First</option>
    <option>Second</option>
</select>

$('select').val('Second');

http://jsfiddle.net/qbtDj/

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This is very bizarre, but with the help of who we generally consider our lead developer, found out that when our little select box formatter is in use, the code that does the updating is actually counting the <div>s and <li>s and other tags put in to format the box. The solution was to put in a line of code that forces ONLY <select> elements to be counted, and that was the root of the problem. All works now.

Why it was locking up the drop-down, though, I don't know!

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This works in Firefox 17.0.1 on Mac OS X 10.8.4, does it work on your platform too? If it does, the problem would indeed be some interference with another library.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <script src="jquery-1.10.1.min.js"></script>
    <script>
        function test () {
            $('select[name=foo]').prop('selectedIndex', 1);
        }
    </script>
</head>

<body>

    <form>
        Should display 'one' after button click:
        <select name="foo">
            <option>zero</option>
            <option>one</option>
            <option>two</option>
            <option>three</option>
        </select>
    </form>

    <button type="button" onclick="test()">set index to 1</button>

</body>
</html>
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