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In Python you have the None singleton, which acts pretty oddly in certain circumstances:

>>> a = None
>>> type(a)
<type 'NoneType'>
>>> isinstance(a,None)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: isinstance() arg 2 must be a class, type, or tuple of classes and types

So first off, <type 'NoneType'> displays that None is not a type, but that NoneType is. Yet when you run isinstance(a,NoneType), it responds with an error: NameError: name 'NoneType' is not defined

Now, given this, if you have a function with an input default set to None, and need to check, you would do the following:

if variable is None:
    #do something
else:
    #do something

what is the reason that I cannot do the following instead:

if isinstance(variable,None): #or NoneType
    #do something
else:
    #do something

I am just looking for a detailed explanation so I can better understand this

Edit: good application

Lets say I wanted to use isinstance so that I can do something if variable is a variety of types, including None:

if isinstance(variable,(None,str,float)):
    #do something
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if variable == None is anti-idiomatic Python. The standard way to do this test is by making use of the fact that None is a singleton: use if variable is None instead. –  Henry Keiter Jun 19 '13 at 18:21
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can try:

>>> variable = None
>>> isinstance(variable,type(None))
True
>>> variable = True
>>> isinstance(variable,type(None))
False

isinstance takes 2 arguments isinstance(object, classinfo) Here, by passing None you are setting classinfo to None, hence the error. You need pass in the type.

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None is not a type, it is the singleton instance itself - and the second argument of isinstance must be a type, class or tuple of them. Hence, you need to use NoneType from types.

from types import NoneType
print isinstance(None, NoneType)
print isinstance(None, (NoneType, str, float))
True
True

Although, I would often be inclined to replace isinstance(x, (NoneType, str, float)) with x is None or isinstance(x, (str, float)).

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Good answer and explanation, but I accepted karthikr because it did not require an import –  Ryan Saxe Jun 19 '13 at 18:36
1  
@RyanSaxe It's alright, I forgive you. But if you plan on using NoneType a lot I would just import it from types. It seems unnecessary to call type(None) when you can easily access that value. –  arshajii Jun 19 '13 at 18:39
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None is a value(instance) and not a type. As the error message shows, isinstance expects the second argument to be a type.

The type of None is type(None), or Nonetype if you import it (from types import NoneType)

Note: the idiomatic way to do the test is variable is None. Short and descriptive.

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None is the just a value of types.NoneType, it's not a type.

And the error is clear enough:

TypeError: isinstance() arg 2 must be a class, type, or tuple of classes and types

From the docs:

None is the sole value of types.NoneType. None is frequently used to represent the absence of a value, as when default arguments are not passed to a function.

You can use types.NoneType

>>> from types import NoneType
>>> isinstance(None, NoneType)
True

is operator also works fine:

>>> a = None
>>> a is None
True
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