Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I've just read that in a text-book, so I wanted to know if that's actually true.

Let's say, we have an array with some values in it that we want to iterate through:


for(int x = 0; x < array.length; x++) {
     //some code
}

Now every time it jumps back to the beginning of the loop it has to re-calculate the length of the array. Therefore, the book suggests, it would be better practice to create an integer of that length and compare x with that integer instead of the array-length.


for(int x = 0, int length = array.length; x < length; x++) {
     //some code
}

So from my understandings the first version is appearently slower but saves memory, whereas in the second version we use a little more space to make it faster. But I've never seen the second version in practice, so I wanted to know what code would be better to use.

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
1  
Use the one that's more readable (the first one) until you can show that performance has become an issue in your application. And as @Jason said, arrays store the length as a public (non-calculated) field. – GriffeyDog Jun 19 '13 at 19:18
1  
If that book is about Java, you need to throw it away immediately. Conditional on it being about Java, I have enough information to conclude that it's a terrible book. – jason Jun 19 '13 at 19:21
    
@Jason Oh man, 30$ wasted for nothing. Thank you anyways! – felix fritz Jun 19 '13 at 19:29
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Now every time it jumps back to the beginning of the loop it has to re-calculate the length of the array.

Completely untrue. Array lengths are stored as part of the array in Java.

From the docs:

The members of an array type are all of the following:

  • The public final field length, which contains the number of components of the array. length may be positive or zero.
  • The public method clone, which overrides the method of the same name in class Object and throws no checked exceptions. The return type of the clone method of an array type T[] is T[].

    A clone of a multidimensional array is shallow, which is to say that it creates only a single new array. Subarrays are shared.

  • All the members inherited from class Object; the only method of Object that is not inherited is its clone method.

Also:

Therefore, the book suggests, it would be better practice to create an integer of that length and compare x with that integer instead of the array-length.

Is this a Java-centric book? If so, throw it away immediately and get a new book. Getting something this fundamental wrong is a terrible signal about the quality of the book.

share|improve this answer
    
What about collections? – felix fritz Jun 19 '13 at 19:16
2  
If you were to iterate over a List using a regular for-loop with size() and get(index), it may help. Although, I can't come up with an example List implementation which has an expensive size() (which may benefit from caching) and an inexpensive get(index). Either way, you'd probably be better off using an ListIterator anyhow. – Mattias Buelens Jun 19 '13 at 19:20
2  
+1 on throwing away the book – Steve Kuo Jun 19 '13 at 19:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.