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I have something like this:

private void myPrinter(int[] arr) throws IOException{
    FileWriter outFile = new FileWriter("myFile.txt",true);
    PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter(outFile);
    //BufferedWriter out = new BufferedWriter(outFile);
    //PrintStream out=new PrintStream(outFile);
    for (int i=0;i<arr.length;i++){
        System.out.print(arr[i]+" ");
        out.print(arr[i]+" ");   
    }
    System.out.println();
    // out.newLine();
    out.println();
    //out.flush();
    out.close();
}

When it prints an array with 100 elements it is fine. When it comes to print an array with more than 255 elements it produces something like ‱‰‱‱‱‱‰‰‱‱‰‱਍ When I add out.print(" "+arr[i]+" "); i.e space in front of arr[i] it is fine. However, I do not need that extra space at the front and I don't understand why it is needed. This method is called in a for loop iterating around a 2D array. console prints it fine but in txt file is printed as shown above. The code that is method is called is as follows:

 final int[] anArr=init();
 for (int idz=0;idz< z;idz++ ){
     int[] toBe=new int[anArr.length];
     System.arraycopy( anArr, 0, toBe, 0, anArr.length );
     arr[z]=create(toBe);
     try {
         myPrinter(arr[z]);
     } catch (IOException e) {
         // TODO Auto-generated catch block
         e.printStackTrace();
     }

I tried adding a line before anything is printed and it works. However, when I later manually remove the line from the txt file and save, it turns back to the gibberish text. Is there something wrong with my txt configurations or something else?

share|improve this question
    
fyi, you can just do print(arr[i] + " "); –  noMAD Jun 19 '13 at 19:49
2  
Show the code where myPrinter method is called. –  Vishal K Jun 19 '13 at 19:57
1  
Adding SSCCE that actually reproduces this behaviour would be helpful. –  Pshemo Jun 19 '13 at 20:00
1  
if ((i % 50) == 0) { out.flush(); } might help too, but it should not be necessary. By the way z < z in the for seems a bit off. –  Joop Eggen Jun 20 '13 at 10:35
1  
how do you open your text file? I seems odd that the problems reappear after you remove the empty line in front of your file. consider using gVIM as an editor (for this situation, as a test.) –  Angelo Fuchs Jun 20 '13 at 11:29

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