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I am trying code to print a three digit number in words. But this isn't working if first two digits from right are between 11 & 19 (both including).

Any help?

package com;

import java.util.Stack;

public class TestMain {
public static void main(String[] args) {

Integer i=512;
int temp =i;int pos=1;
Stack<String> stack=new Stack<String>();
while(temp>0){

	int rem=temp%10;
	temp=temp/10;
	if(rem!=0){stack.push(getString(rem, pos));}
	pos*=10;
}
do{
	System.out.print(stack.pop()+" ");
}while(!stack.isEmpty());



}
static String getString(int i,int position){
	String str=null;

	if(position==10){
		i*=position;
	}

	switch(i){
	case 1:
		str= "One";break;

	case 2:
		str= "two";break;
	case 3:
		str= "three";break;
	case 4:
		str= "four";break;
	case 5:
		str= "five";break;
	case 6:
		str= "six";break;
	case 7:
		str= "seven";break;
	case 8:
		str= "eight";break;
	case 9:
		str= "nine";break;
	case 10:
		str= "Ten";break;
	case 11:
		str= "Eleven";break;
	case 12:
		str= "Twelve";break;
	case 13:
		str= "thirteen";break;
	case 14:
		str= "fourteen";break;
	case 15:
		str= "fifteen";break;
	case 16:
		str= "sixteen";break;
	case 17:
		str= "seventeen";break;
	case 18:
		str= "eighteen";break;
	case 19:
		str= "Nineteen";	break;
	case 20:
		str= "twenty";break;
	case 30:
		str= "Thirty";break;
	case 40:
		str= "forty";break;
	case 50:
		str= "Fifty";break;
	case 60:
		str= "sixty";break;
	case 70:
		str= "Seventy";break;
	case 80:
		str= "Eighty";	break;
	case 90:
		str= "Ninety";break;
	case 100:
		str= "Hundred";
		break;
	}
	if(position>=100){
	str=str+ " "+getString(position, 0);
	}
	return str;
}

}

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closed as too localized by Jonathan Leffler, Mark, Kris, dmeister, Hardik Mishra Oct 16 '12 at 11:24

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4 Answers 4

For a three-digit number (negative or positive), you just need to divide it into sections and remember that numbers less than 20 are special (in any block of a hundred). As pseudo-code (well, Python, actually but close enough to pseudo-code), we first define the lookup tables:

nums1 = ["","one","two","three","four","five","six","seven",
         "eight","nine","ten","eleven","twelve","thirteen",
         "fourteen","fifteen","sixteen","seventeen","eighteen",
         "nineteen"]
nums2 = ["","","twenty","thirty","forty","fifty","sixty",
         "seventy","eighty","ninety"]

Note that there's no onety for numbers between ten and nineteen. As previously mentioned, numbers under twenty in each block of a hundred are treated specially.

Then we have the function which first checks the input value and handles negative numbers as a one-level recursive call. It also handles the special case of zero:

def speak (n):
    if n < -999 or n > 999:
        return "out of range"

    if n < 0:
        return "negative " + speak (-n)

    if n == 0:
        return "zero"

Next step is to work out the three digits in the number:

    hundreds = int (n / 100)
    tens = int ((n % 100) / 10)
    ones = n % 10

Hundreds are simple since it's only zero through nine:

    if hundreds > 0:
        retstr = nums1[hundreds] + " hundred"
        if tens != 0 or ones != 0:
            retstr = retstr + " and "
    else:
        retstr = ""

The rest is simply treating values from zero to nineteen as special, otherwise we treat it as Xty Y (like forty two or seventy seven):

    if tens != 0 or ones != 0:
        if tens < 2:
            retstr = retstr + nums1[tens*10+ones]
        else:
            retstr = retstr + nums2[tens]
            if ones != 0:
                retstr = retstr + " " + nums1[ones]
    return retstr

And a quick and dirty test suite at the bottom:

for i in range (-1000, 1001):
    print "%5d %s"%(i, speak (i))

produces:

-1000 out of range
 -999 negative nine hundred and ninety nine
 -998 negative nine hundred and ninety eight
    : 
   -2 negative two
   -1 negative one
    0 zero
    1 one
    2 two
    :
   10 ten
   11 eleven
   12 twelve
    :
  998 nine hundred and ninety eight
  999 nine hundred and ninety nine
 1000 out of range
share|improve this answer
    
Added java version –  jjnguy Nov 12 '09 at 6:16
    
+1 for the English spelling of the numbers (as opposed to the American). To see the difference, compare the outputs for 999 in this solution and the Java solution. [I still remember a book of puzzles in which one of the answers depended on no A's appearing in the spelled out numbers until you reached 1000. No-one in England would get that question correct.] –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 12 '09 at 13:23

Here is the code in Java:

private static String[] DIGIT_WORDS = {
    "zero", "one", "two", "three", "four",
    "five", "six", "seven", "eight", "nine" };
private static String[] TENS_WORDS = {
    "ten", "twenty", "thirty", "forty", "fifty",
    "sixty", "seventy", "eighty", "ninety" };
private static String[] TEENS_WORDS = {
    "ten", "eleven", "twelve", "thirteen", "fourteen",
    "fifteen", "sixteen", "seventeen", "eighteen", "nineteen" };

private static String getHundredWords(int num) {
    if (num > 999 || num < 0)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(
            "Cannot get hundred word of a number not in the range 0-999");
    if (num == 0) return "zero";    	
    String ret = "";
    if (num > 99) {
        ret += DIGIT_WORDS[num / 100] + " hundred ";
        num %= 100;
    }
    if (num < 20 && num > 9) {
        ret += TEENS_WORDS[num % 10];
    } else if (num < 10 && num > 0) {
        ret += DIGIT_WORDS[num];
    } else if (num != 0) {
        ret += TENS_WORDS[num / 10 - 1];
        if (num % 10 != 0) {
        ret += " " + DIGIT_WORDS[num % 10];
    }}

    return ret;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It works...I promise. –  jjnguy Nov 12 '09 at 6:28
    
Before anyone decides to downvote this for providing full solutions for homework, please remember that the homework tag was added after this answer, and not by the OP. –  paxdiablo Nov 12 '09 at 7:39
    
Usually I don't post code like this...but I had actually just written it yesterday for homework. (Thanks pax) –  jjnguy Nov 12 '09 at 7:43
    
I'm not going to down-vote either of your answers, but I can't see how this could NOT be homework. With or without the homework tag. If the OP decides to blindly copy-and-paste this and hand it in as his/her own, I hope the teacher Googles his or her way into this this post. :) –  Bart Kiers Nov 12 '09 at 10:43
    
I submit the code as a working example. I hope it is not copied directly into a homework assignment. –  jjnguy Nov 12 '09 at 10:48
  • You have to treat zero specially.
  • You are using modulo 10 in the test main program, so you don't see 11-20 in the called function. Actually, it is not clear that you see 20, 30, 40, etc either.
  • Your capitalization is inconsistent; good programmers are paranoid about consistency.
share|improve this answer

It's been done and posted so you can benefit:

http://www.rgagnon.com/javadetails/java-0426.html

https://sourceforge.net/projects/numberreader/

share|improve this answer
    
seems little complex –  abhishek Nov 12 '09 at 5:55
    
Definitly not. Clean and understandable code. –  Andreas_D Nov 12 '09 at 8:04
    
I have written a cleaner version: source-code.biz/snippets/java/13.htm –  Christian d'Heureuse Jul 20 '12 at 10:14