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Sorry if the question is not clear, I was wondering how to write a program in C++ that can output all the combination of some sentences, using the formula C=n!/(n-k)!. For example, that is the kind of thing I'm trying to have printed:

combination no 1: sentence1 sentence2 sentence3 sentence4

combination no 2: sentence1 sentence2 sentence4 sentence3

combination no 3: sentence1 sentence3 sentence2 sentence4

combination no 4: sentence1 sentence3 sentence4 sentence2

combination no 5: sentence1 sentence4 sentence3 sentence2

combination no 6: sentence1 sentence4 sentence2 sentence3

And so on...

Also, is it possible to have up to 1 billion of combinations or there are some restrictions?

EDIT.

I tried the following program, but I can't find a way to change what in the formula above is the "k" variable.

// next_permutation example
#include <iostream>     // std::cout
#include <algorithm>    // std::next_permutation, std::sort
#include <string>       // std::string
#include <vector>       // std::vector

int main () {
  std::string sentence1 = " A Sentence number one ";
  std::string sentence2 = " B Sentence number two ";
  std::string sentence3 = " C Sentence number three ";
  std::string sentence4 = " D Sentence number four ";

  // Store all the elements in a container ( here a std::vector)
  std::vector<std::string> myVectorOfStrings;      
  // In the vector we add all the sentences.
  // Note : It is possible to do myVectorOfStrings.push_back("Some sentence");
  myVectorOfStrings.push_back(sentence1);
  myVectorOfStrings.push_back(sentence2);
  myVectorOfStrings.push_back(sentence3);
  myVectorOfStrings.push_back(sentence4);

  // The elements must be sorted to output all the combinations
  std::sort (myVectorOfStrings.begin(),myVectorOfStrings.end());


  std::cout << "The 4! possible permutations with 4 elements:\n";
  do {
    //This printing can be improved to handle any number of sentences, not only four.
    std::cout << myVectorOfStrings[0] << ' ' << myVectorOfStrings[1] << ' ' << myVectorOfStrings[2] << ' ' << myVectorOfStrings[3] << '\n';
  } while ( std::next_permutation(myVectorOfStrings.begin(),myVectorOfStrings.end()) );

  std::cout << "After loop: "  << myVectorOfStrings[0] << ' ' << myVectorOfStrings[1] << ' ' << myVectorOfStrings[2] << ' ' << myVectorOfStrings[3] << '\n';

  return 0;
}
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closed as not a real question by Jonathan Potter, Ziyao Wei, bensiu, Tilak, Jave Jun 20 '13 at 7:41

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
std::next_permutation –  Mooing Duck Jun 19 '13 at 20:19
2  
Just a tip: requests to "please write my whole program for me" are not looked on very favorably. –  Jonathan Potter Jun 19 '13 at 20:24
    
Alright, I took note. –  user2499266 Jun 19 '13 at 23:55

2 Answers 2

You probably mean you want all the possible combinations of 'n' strings. There are n! possible cases. You can use the std::next_permutation Here is how :

I suppose that all your sentences are std::string like this :

// next_permutation example
#include <iostream>     // std::cout
#include <algorithm>    // std::next_permutation, std::sort
#include <string>       // std::string
#include <vector>       // std::vector

int main () {
  std::string sentence1 = " A Sentence number one ";
  std::string sentence2 = " B Sentence number two ";
  std::string sentence3 = " C Sentence number three ";
  std::string sentence4 = " D Sentence number four ";

  // Store all the elements in a container ( here a std::vector)
  std::vector<std::string> myVectorOfStrings;      
  // In the vector we add all the sentences.
  // Note : It is possible to do myVectorOfStrings.push_back("Some sentence");
  myVectorOfStrings.push_back(sentence1);
  myVectorOfStrings.push_back(sentence2);
  myVectorOfStrings.push_back(sentence3);
  myVectorOfStrings.push_back(sentence4);

  // The elements must be sorted to output all the combinations
  std::sort (myVectorOfStrings.begin(),myVectorOfStrings.end());


  std::cout << "The 4! possible permutations with 4 elements:\n";
  do {
    //This printing can be improved to handle any number of sentences, not only four.
    std::cout << myVectorOfStrings[0] << ' ' << myVectorOfStrings[1] << ' ' << myVectorOfStrings[2] << ' ' << myVectorOfStrings[3] << '\n';
  } while ( std::next_permutation(myVectorOfStrings.begin(),myVectorOfStrings.end()) );

  std::cout << "After loop: "  << myVectorOfStrings[0] << ' ' << myVectorOfStrings[1] << ' ' << myVectorOfStrings[2] << ' ' << myVectorOfStrings[3] << '\n';

  return 0;
}

This is a simple example for the printing. If you had more than 4 strings, inside the do-while loop you would use something like this

The do-while loop would then be :

do {
  //Print all the sentences in my vector :
  for( auto i = myVectorOfStrings.begin(); i != myVectorOfStrings.end(); ++i)
    std::cout << *i << ' ';
  // Go to the next line
  std::cout << std::endl;
} while ( std::next_permutation(myVectorOfStrings.begin(),myVectorOfStrings.end()) );

Also, is it possible to have up to 1 billion of combinations or there are some restrictions?

The only restrictions is the memory. In this example you have only 1 vector that stores all the strings. so if you have 10 strings, you will have 10! = 3,628,800 different combinations , but the memory itself is only the memory used by your vector that has 10 strings.

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How can I change the value of what in the formula is k? –  user2499266 Jun 19 '13 at 23:42

You can use next_permutation to do this.

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