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I am attempting to create an injection style mechanism to tie EE5 to another framework that does not support EJB injection. Currently I am using a custom annotation and a naming convention to look up the EJB in JNDI:

    @ContainerResource
private LocalListener listener; 

@Initialize
public void init(){
    new Injection<InjectionAction>().inject(this);
}

The injection class:

public class Injection<T> {

public void inject(T clazz) {
    for(Field field : clazz.getClass().getDeclaredFields()){
        if(field.isAnnotationPresent(ContainerResource.class)){
            Object resource = findResource(field);
            try {
                field.setAccessible(true);
                field.set(clazz, resource);
            } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }


}

private Object findResource(Field field) {
    Object resource = null;
    try {
        InitialContext ic = new InitialContext();
        resource =  ic.lookup(field.getType().getSimpleName()+ "Impl/local");

    } catch (NamingException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    return resource;



}

}

I would like to find a more robust method, that does not rely on a naming convention, to search the container for an EJB based on its local interface.

share|improve this question
    
I am most likely going a different route in my work. Prior to that decision one of the ideas I was thinking about was creating a kind of aggregator EJB to inject all of the possible beans my custom code would need access to. Then reference that EJB with JNDI and search its contents(a pseudo context). I included this comment in an attempt to provide anyone looking at this question with a workable alternative, but I am not certain it qualifies as an answer. –  jake Jul 30 '13 at 19:30
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1 Answer

I don't know if I'm understanding your problem, but if you want to look up an object in a JNDI registry the only way is trought his name, therefore, you have to know the name or to rely in a name convention.

EJB injection internally is implemented using JNDI and also rely in a name convention. If you use the annotation @EJB without parameters the container will look up the object using the local interface name or explicitly you can to indicate the used binding name with @EJB (name="myBeanJNDIbindigName")

share|improve this answer
    
The code I want to "inject" with the EJB is being deployed to a system that is not EJB aware and will not process @EJB annotations. I was not aware that EJB relied on naming conventions internally, I must look into this. I wanted to make it type based. –  jake Jun 20 '13 at 12:50
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