Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

At least as I've implemented it in my code, I had to modify the StartNew Task to get the same behavior. In my View there's a start button. It's IsEnabled property is bound to a Boolean in the View Model. Without adding await task.ContinueWith(_ => true); and moving return true; out of the try block, the PopulateListStartNew Task doesn't wait so the button stays enabled. I prefer to use Task.Factory.StartNew because passing a TaskScheduler makes for more readable code (no Dispatcher clutter). Records is an ObservableCollection.

I thought that Task.Run was basically a shortcut (per Task.Run vs Task.Factory.StartNew. At any rate, I'd like to better understand the difference in behavior and would certainly appreciate any suggestions related to making my example code better.

public async Task<bool> PopulateListTaskRun(CancellationToken cancellationToken)
{
    try
    {
        await Task.Run(async () =>
            {
                // Clear the records out first, if any
                Application.Current.Dispatcher.InvokeAsync(() => Records.Clear());


                for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++)
                {
                    if (cancellationToken.IsCancellationRequested)
                    {
                        return;
                    }

                    // Resharper says do this to avoid "Access to modified closure"
                    var i1 = i;

                    Application.Current.Dispatcher.InvokeAsync(() =>
                        {
                            Records.Add(new Model
                                {
                                    Name = NamesList[i1],
                                    Number = i1
                                });

                            Status = "cur: " +
                                        i1.ToString(
                                            CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
                        });

                    // Artificial delay so we can see what's going on
                    await Task.Delay(200);
                }

                Records[0].Name = "Yes!";
            }, cancellationToken);

        return true;
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

public async Task<bool> PopulateListStartNew(CancellationToken cancellationToken, TaskScheduler taskScheduler)
{
    try
    {
        var task = await Task.Factory.StartNew(async () =>
            {
                // Clear the records out first, if any
                Records.Clear();


                for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++)
                {
                    if (cancellationToken.IsCancellationRequested)
                    {
                        return;
                    }

                    Records.Add(new Model
                        {
                            Name = NamesList[i],
                            Number = i
                        });

                    Status = "cur: " +
                                i.ToString(
                                    CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);


                    // Artificial delay so we can see what's going on
                    await Task.Delay(200);
                }

                Records[0].Name = "Yes!";
            }, cancellationToken, TaskCreationOptions.None, taskScheduler);

        // Had to add this
        await task.ContinueWith(_ => true);
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        return false;
    }

    // Had to move this out of try block
    return true;
}
share|improve this question
    
Do you actually need the TaskScheduler parameter? Usually, you either want to run code in the current context (which await does by default), or you want to run it on the ThreadPool, in which case you would use Task.Run(). – svick Jun 20 '13 at 0:35
    
@svick. I updated my post to mention that Records is an ObservableCollection. So, yes, I either need TaskScheduler or Dispatcher wrapping to update it and display in a bound ListView. Sorry, I should have made that clear up front. – Stonetip Jun 20 '13 at 1:28
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The link you posted in your question has the answer: Task.Run understands and unwraps async Task delegates, while StartNew returns a Task<Task> instead, which you have to unwrap yourself by calling Unwrap or doing a double-await.

However, I recommend you completely rewrite the code as follows. Notes:

  • Don't use Dispatcher. There shouldn't be a need for it with properly-written async code.
  • Treat all your background worker methods and asynchronous operations as "services" for your UI thread. So your method will return to the UI context periodically as necessary.

Like this:

public async Task<bool> PopulateListTaskRunAsync(CancellationToken cancellationToken)
{
  try
  {
    // Clear the records out first, if any
    Records.Clear();

    for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
      cancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();

      Records.Add(new Model
      {
        Name = NamesList[i],
        Number = i
      });

      Status = "cur: " + i.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);

      // Artificial delay so we can see what's going on
      await Task.Delay(200);
    }

    Records[0].Name = "Yes!";
    return true;
  }
  catch (Exception)
  {
    return false;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hey, that really helps...I've gotten into some unnecessarily complex code and forgot to try simple first. One thing: If I use ThrowIfCancellationRequested then the method returns false and my Start button stays disabled. I realize I'm trying to do two things - detect when the Task has stopped running and detect when it has run successfully, i.e. no cancellation or errors. I need to re-evaluate. – Stonetip Jun 20 '13 at 4:47
    
The easiest way to do that is to simplify the code more: remove the try/catch in PopulateListTaskRunAsync. The try/catch should be in the method where it's awaited. – Stephen Cleary Jun 20 '13 at 12:00

I'm too not comfortable with all this plumbing but I'll try to answer.

First why your second code does not work:

  • you give StartNew an async delegate which is something like Func<Task> so StartNew will return a Task<Task> and you wait on the outer task which ends immediately as it consists in returning the inner Task (not really sure about that)

  • then you await the continuation of the inner task, the inner thread of execution, what you intended to do; but I guess it should be the same if you awaited directly the inner task itself this way:

    await await Task.Factory.StartNew(async ...
    

Why your first code works:

  • according to the MSDN documentation Task.Run directly returns a Task object, the inner task I guess

  • so you directly await for the inner task, not an intermediate one, so it just works as expected

At least this is my understanding and keep in mind I've not yet played with all this stuff (no VS 2012). :)

share|improve this answer
    
The second code works, just requires the modifications I show. But thanks for jogging my memory regarding the double await await. I have come across that in my reading. Will have to try it. What I'm finding difficult with all Task-related code is getting the right placement/sequence of features to get what I want. In this case, I want a ListView to be continually updating as the ObservableCollection is populated, while keeping the Window UI responsive. Customers complain about long-running code locking applications. – Stonetip Jun 20 '13 at 1:32
    
"the inner task I guess". Not exactly true: it returns a task that represents the completion of both the inner and outer tasks (it works like TaskExtensions.Unwrap). – Matt Smith Jun 20 '13 at 12:23
    
@MattSmith: thanks for the clarification. – Pragmateek Jun 20 '13 at 12:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.