Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this question: say starting address is 100.

int arr[2][3][2] = {{{2,4},{7,8},{3,4}},{{2,2},{2,3},{3,4}}};
printf(“%u %u %u %d \n”,arr,*arr,**arr,***arr); // Line 2
printf(“%u %u %u %d \n”,arr+1,*arr+1,**arr+1,***arr+1); // Line 3
}
Answer:
100, 100, 100, 2
114, 104, 102, 3

Explanation:

For Line 3: arr+1 increases in the third dimension thus points to value at 114, *a+1 increments in second dimension thus points to 104, **arr +1 increments the first dimension thus points to 102 and ***arr+1 first gets the value at first location and then increments it by 1. Hence is the output of second line.

Memory Layout

My Question - I tried my best. but i could get what explanation meant for Line 3 ! please explain

share|improve this question
2  
***arr My eyes and brain get hurt when I see it. –  Mahesh Jun 19 '13 at 22:55
3  
Because of precedence, *arr + 1 is the value stored at arr added to the number 1. –  Kevin Jun 19 '13 at 22:56
    
@Kevin In this example the value stored at arr has type int [3][2]. You can not add it to the number 1 –  kotlomoy Jun 19 '13 at 23:55
    
@kotlomoy arr decays into a pointer, so it adds 1 via pointer arithmetic; it actually increases the value by something > 1, but it is valid to +1 a pointer. –  Kevin Jun 20 '13 at 2:55
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

What is type of int arr[2][3][2]? It is array of 2 elements of type int [3][2]. This is 3rd dimension.

What is int [3][2]? It is array of 3 elements of type int [2]. This is 2nd dimension.

What is int [2]? It is array of 2 elements of type int. This is 1st dimension.

Here's diagram

enter image description here

In line 2:

  • arr points to first element of 3rd dimension,
  • *arr points to first element of 2nd dimension,
  • **arr points to first element of 1st dimension,
  • ***arr takes the value of first element of 1st dimension.

You can see from diagram that all dimensions start from address 100. Hence the output of line 2: "100, 100, 100, 2".

In line 3:

  • arr + 1 points to second element of 3rd dimension,
  • *arr + 1 points to second element of 2nd dimension,
  • **arr + 1 points to second element of 1st dimension,
  • ***arr + 1 takes the value of first element of 1st dimension and increments it.

You can see from diagram that second element of 3rd dimension has address 112 (not 114!), second element of 2nd dimension has address 104, second element of 1st dimension has address 102. Hence the output of line 3 must be: "112, 104, 102, 3"

share|improve this answer
    
Great diagram! Got my vote. –  paddy Jun 20 '13 at 0:20
    
Thanks.. with this diagram it is much clear ! –  user2494601 Jun 20 '13 at 7:33
add comment

Your answer is wrong. The first value for line 3 should be 112, not 114.

When you use arithmetic on a pointer, it changes the address by some number of elements (of whatever size the array stores). When you use an array as if it were a pointer, C will manage that for you.

When you use arr, the compiler will say you have a pointer to an array holding two elements of type int[3][2]. So adding one to that means adding sizeof(int[3][2]) which is 12. Here is a table to show this:

code      element type   ints per element    bytes per element   array length
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
arr       int[3][2]      6                   12                  2
*arr      int[2]         2                   4                   3
**arr     int            1                   2                   2
share|improve this answer
    
great explanation with the help of table –  PHI Jun 20 '13 at 4:54
add comment

there isn't much value in any "explanation" within your example. See, you're mixing things up. That's because your multi--ing (**arr and the like) only is sensible, if you're allocating with C's malloc. Then the rows of a 2D array are arr[i] of type (int *), and within any row a column value is arr[i][j] of type (int), and the whole 2D matrix is *arr of type (int *). In 3D you have arr[i][j][k] of type (int) down to **arr for the whole 3D structure. But using int arr[2][3][2] = {...}, just use arr[i][j][k] to get a matrix element and i.e. arr[0], arr[1] for the rows. Pointers aren't really useful with those compile-time allocated 2-3D matrices. Always remember **arr is a pointer to a pointer to a pointer, if and only if someone came along and did all the C-malloc-ing. Regards, M.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, the system did eat up all my asteriks, so don'r read that. M. –  Micha Jun 19 '13 at 23:34
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.