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I'm currently writing some code to convert java code to c++ code and consequently ending up with some pretty hairy issues. My question is, is it possible to have an overloaded operator that returns the templated value from the containing class?

Ie: I want to be able to do the following with the following classes.

SmartPointer<ArrayClass<bool>*> boolArray = new ArrayClass<bool>(true, true, false, false);
bool b = boolArray[1];


template <typename T> class SmartPointer
{
    T data;

    template <typename U>
    U operator [](int i) const
    {
        return ((*T)(*data))[index];
    }
}

template ArrayClass<U>
{
    // Various constructors...

    U operator [](int i) const
    {
        // Implementation here
    }
}

The problem I get (understandably) is: error C2783: 'U SmartPointer::operator const' : could not deduce template argument for 'U' The compiler doesn't know what U is and I want to be able to tell it that it's bool - because this is what the ArrayClass will be returning. The SmartPointer might not contain an array, in which case the [] operator wouldn't make sense. However I want to be able to pass it through to the object inside the smart pointer in case it does... ?

I don't know what to do to make this work. Perhaps it's not possible??

ANSWER:

Thanks to everyone for responding. There are 3 solutions provided that are essentially the same, but I've award this to Oktalist as he got in first. I still have a difficulty with this solution though, as I'm passing pointers into my SmartPointer class to allow me to use forward declared classes. This prevented me from using T::value_type as my return type, but that appears to be the right way to do it. It looks like I'm asking to much of the compiler and it looks like I'll have to revert back to simply dereferencing the smartpointer in order to do the array access!

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3  
Is there some reason why you are writing your own smart pointer ? There are a few in the STL and in Boost. –  Alexandre P. Levasseur Jun 20 '13 at 1:22
1  
Bit hard to follow that pseudo-code - is the problem with the SmartPointer operator[] or the ArrayClass one? If the former, can't you just use decltype to decide the return type based on the return value, getting rid of the template <typename U> bit completely? –  Tony D Jun 20 '13 at 1:24
    
I agree with @TonyD it's pretty hard to tell what you are trying to achieve –  aaronman Jun 20 '13 at 1:25
2  
As a rule of thumb, always provide a short, self-contained, compilable example (sscce.org) –  Nemo Jun 20 '13 at 1:30
1  
@PeterCarpenter: it does look like you're mixing concerns there... your "smart pointer" is trying to expose the API of the pointed-to object, providing a pass-through operator[] rather than requiring dereferencing then operator[] invocation. I guess you're aiming to have the subsequent JAVA code using that array then be valid C++, rather than having to inject dereferencing at each point of use. The latter's cleaner in a C++ sense and means you can reuse existing smart pointers, but who knows what'll work out best on balance. –  Tony D Jun 20 '13 at 1:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The traditional C++03 way is to use a typedef, typically named value_type. In C++11 we can improve upon this with auto and decltype. Here is your example modified to use both:

SmartPointerCPP03<ArrayClass<bool>> boolArray = new ArrayClass<bool>(true, true, false, false);
SmartPointerCPP11<ArrayClass<bool>> boolArray = new ArrayClass<bool>(true, true, false, false);
bool b = boolArray[1];

template <typename T> class SmartPointerCPP03
{
    T* data;

    typename T::value_type operator [](int i) const
    {
        return (*data)[i];
    }
}

template <typename T> class SmartPointerCPP11
{
    T* data;

    auto operator [](int i) const -> decltype(std::declval<T>()[i])
    {
        return (*data)[i];
    }
}

template <typename T> class SmartPointerCPP14
{
    T* data;

    auto operator [](int i) const
    {
        return (*data)[i];
    }
}

template <typename U> ArrayClass
{
    // Various constructors...

    typedef U value_type;

    U operator [](int i) const
    {
        // Implementation here
    }
}

I also took the liberty of changing T data to T* data and removing the * from the parameter in the instantiation. By the way, your (T*) cast was wrong, and I removed that too.

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You'd need to change that to typename T::value_type or it won't compile. –  Pete Jun 20 '13 at 1:41
    
Thanks Oktalist, Unfortunately yes, we're trying to target BB10 which doesn't support C++11 (yet - hopefully they will soon). I'm getting an error when it's instantiating the SmartPointer class for non-array types - where value_type is not defined. (Error is "'T::value_type' : dependent name is not a type", and when I prefix T::value_type with template as suggested it states that "'T' must be a class or namespace when followed by '::'. Do you have any suggestions on how to make this work for all types of T? –  Peter Carpenter Jun 20 '13 at 1:57
    
@PeterCarpenter prefix it with typename not template –  Oktalist Jun 20 '13 at 2:03
    
Sorry, you are right. It suggested that I prefix with 'typename' and I get the error on non array types. I'm currently seeing if I can get this to work using @Pete's ValueTypeOf function. –  Peter Carpenter Jun 20 '13 at 2:08
    
@PeterCarpenter well of course all of these answers will fail to compile if the [] operator is not defined for your type. –  Oktalist Jun 20 '13 at 2:12

To start with, make the SmartPointer accept the non-pointer type:

SmartPointer<ArrayClass<bool> > boolArray = new ArrayClass<bool>(true, true, false, false);

Add a typedef to the ArrayClass:

template <typename U> class ArrayClass
{
    typedef U value_type;
    ...
};

Then write a metafunction to get the type:

template <typename T> struct ValueTypeOf {
    typedef typename T::value_type type;
};

Then use this in the SmartPointer:

template <typename T> 
class SmartPointer
{
    typedef typename ValueTypeOf<T>::type value_type;

    T* data;

    value_type operator [](int i) const
    {
        return ((*data))[index];
    }
};

By using the ValueTypeOf metafunction, you can specialize it based upon the type, so if your type does not have a value_type member, you can do something different to get at it.

Edit: to specialize for a pointer type example:

struct A {
    typedef int value_type;
};

template <typename T>
struct ValueTypeOf
{
    typedef typename T::value_type type;
};

template <typename T>
struct ValueTypeOf<T*>
{
    typedef typename T::value_type type;
};


int main()
{
    ValueTypeOf<A>::type  foo = 0; // foo is an int
    ValueTypeOf<A*>::type bar = 0; // bar is an int

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi @Pete, thanks for your answer. Is there a way to get this to work with T being a pointer? The reason I went down this path was because I was getting cyclic header dependencies and wanted to use forward declarations for the template types... –  Peter Carpenter Jun 20 '13 at 2:13
    
Nevermind - I've looked into this and I'm confident the answer is no. :) This leaves me in a pickle though, but you've definitely answered my question. Thanks. –  Peter Carpenter Jun 20 '13 at 3:16
    
Yes it is possible - use partial template specialization of the ValueTypeOf metafunction - i.e. template <typename T> struct ValueTypeOf<T*> { typedef typename T::value_type type; }; –  Pete Jun 20 '13 at 9:19
    
I don't see how you resolve the cyclic dependencies with pointer types - the templates shouldn't need to know any actual types until the moment of instantiation. Maybe you just need to re-factor your headers. –  Pete Jun 20 '13 at 9:22
    
Added an example for partial specialization for pointer types. –  Pete Jun 20 '13 at 11:44

It's been a while, but I used to do a lot of this. Something like the following should work:

Define a typedef in ArrayClass called value_type, and typedef U to that. Then use T::value_type as the return type of operator [] in SmartPointer.

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