Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

How do I concatenate two lists in Python?

Example:

listone = [1, 2, 3]
listtwo = [4, 5, 6]

Expected outcome:

joinedlist == [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
share|improve this question
1  
what about if listone was [3,2,1]? Will the output change? – barkmadley Nov 12 '09 at 7:06
10  
Could have found answer in any Python reference or tutorial. Personally I don't mind, but this question looks like asked solely for reputation mining ;) – Clergyman Feb 8 '14 at 12:46
    
'merge' as 'create one shallow-copy', 'deep-copy' or 'iterate from'? (@Clergyman, it's not at all that trivial) – smci Sep 12 '14 at 3:31
    
Isn’t this operation called concatination rather than merging? I always thought merging means concatination + sorting. – Lenar Hoyt Nov 8 '14 at 2:33
    
This question's searchability could be improved if the terms 'looping' and 'concatenate' were added. – florisla Sep 9 '15 at 13:22

19 Answers 19

up vote 1453 down vote accepted

Python makes this ridiculously easy.

mergedlist = listone + listtwo
share|improve this answer
35  
does this create a deep copy of listone and appends listtwo? – Daniel F Apr 19 '12 at 12:34
64  
@Daniel it will create a new list with a shallow copy of the items in the first list, followed by a shallow copy of the items in the second list. Use copy.deepcopy to get deep copies of lists. – Daniel G Apr 19 '12 at 14:51
61  
another useful detail here: listone += listtwo results in listone == [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6] – br1ckb0t Jan 29 '14 at 16:14
5  
@br1ckb0t will that change what listone is pointing at? So:list3 = listone listone+=listtwo Is list3 changed as well? – MikeH Feb 19 '14 at 5:01
4  
it does change list3. However, if that isn't a problem, it's simpler more readable to add the two lists instead of creating a new one. – br1ckb0t Feb 20 '14 at 18:55

It's also possible to create a generator that simply iterates over the items in both lists. This allows you to chain lists (or any iterable) together for processing without copying the items to a new list:

import itertools
for item in itertools.chain(listone, listtwo):
   # do something with each list item
share|improve this answer
11  
This is better way because it also works with numpy array. – d.putto Sep 25 '12 at 9:37
1  
will this work the same way: mergedList = itertools.chain(listone, listtwo) for item in mergedList: – yourfriendzak Mar 1 '13 at 0:55
6  
@d.putto: individual item access is very slow for numpy arrays (each access requires to convert the raw memory with a C type to Python object. Vectorized operations such as np.dot() work on the C types directly without the round trip to Python and therefore fast). You could use merged = np.r_[a, b] to get concatenated numpy array. – J.F. Sebastian Apr 30 '14 at 3:38

You can use sets to obtain merged list of unique values

mergedlist = list(set(listone + listtwo))
share|improve this answer
50  
this will lose ordering information. – aaronasterling Sep 20 '10 at 8:45
18  
True, however, it will also remove duplicates, if that's what you are interested in. List addition along would not do that. – metasoarous Aug 21 '12 at 0:28
5  
Better than listone + [x for x in listtwo if x not in listone] – Natim Jan 29 '13 at 13:13
1  
If I had a list of lists, such as this one: [[0, 5], [1, 10], [0, 7], [3, 5]] How would you merge them to avoid duplicates in the key (first value in each sub-list), but if they are duplicates, end up with the sum of the second values? Like so: [[0, 12], [1, 10], [3, 5]] Thanks – jslvtr Jul 23 '13 at 12:24
4  
+1 IMHO this is the correct way to "merge" (union) lists while the "approved" answer describes how to combine/add lists (multiset) – alfasin Apr 27 '14 at 4:07

You could also use extend in order to add a list add the end of another one:

listone = [1,2,3]
listtwo = [4,5,6]
mergedlist = []
mergedlist.extend(listone)
mergedlist.extend(listtwo)
share|improve this answer
    
@MatthewPurdon extend won't take a single item, it expects a list. – mateor Oct 15 '14 at 21:43
    
The real answer! – tprk77 May 18 at 16:21

This is quite simple, I think it was even shown in the tutorial:

>>> listone = [1,2,3]
>>> listtwo = [4,5,6]
>>>
>>> listone + listtwo
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
share|improve this answer

You could simply use the + or += operator as follows:

a = [1, 2, 3]
b = [4, 5, 6]

c = a + b

Or:

c = []
a = [1, 2, 3]
b = [4, 5, 6]

c += (a + b)

Also, if you want the values in the merged list to be unique you can do:

c = list(set(a + b))
share|improve this answer

It's worth noting that the itertools.chain function accepts variable number of arguments:

>>> l1 = ['a']; l2 = ['b', 'c']; l3 = ['d', 'e', 'f']
>>> [i for i in itertools.chain(l1, l2)]
['a', 'b', 'c']
>>> [i for i in itertools.chain(l1, l2, l3)]
['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f']

If an iterable (tuple, list, generator, etc.) is the input, the from_iterable class method may be used:

>>> il = [['a'], ['b', 'c'], ['d', 'e', 'f']]
>>> [i for i in itertools.chain.from_iterable(il)]
['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f']
share|improve this answer

With Python 3.3+ you can use yield from:

listone = [1,2,3]
listtwo = [4,5,6]

def merge(l1, l2):
    yield from l1
    yield from l2

>>> list(merge(listone, listtwo))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

Or, if you want to support an arbitrary number of iterators:

def merge(*iters):
    for it in iters:
        yield from it

>>> list(merge(listone, listtwo, 'abcd', [20, 21, 22]))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 20, 21, 22]
share|improve this answer

If you want to merge the two lists in sorted form, you can use merge function from the heapq library.

from heapq import merge

a = [1,2,4]
b = [2,4,6,7]

print list(merge(a,b))
share|improve this answer

This question directly asks about joining two lists. However it's pretty high in search even when you are looking for a way of joining many lists (including the case when you joining zero lists). Consider this more generic approach:

a = [[1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7,8,9]]
reduce(lambda c, x: c + x, a, [])

Will output:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

Note, this also works correctly when a is [] or [[1,2,3]].

Update

Consider better alternative suggested by Patrick Collins in the comments:

sum(a, [])
share|improve this answer
3  
cleaner: sum(a, []) – Patrick Collins Nov 18 '15 at 1:07

If you don't want to or can't use the plus operator (+), you can uses the __add__ function:

listone = [1,2,3]
listtwo = [4,5,6]

result = list.__add__(listone, listtwo)
print(result)

>>> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
share|improve this answer

If you need to merge two ordered lists with complicated sorting rules, you might have to roll it yourself like in the following code (using a simple sorting rule for readability :-) ).

list1 = [1,2,5]
list2 = [2,3,4]
newlist = []

while list1 and list2:
    if list1[0] == list2[0]:
        newlist.append(list1.pop(0))
        list2.pop(0)
    elif list1[0] < list2[0]:
        newlist.append(list1.pop(0))
    else:
        newlist.append(list2.pop(0))

if list1:
    newlist.extend(list1)
if list2:
    newlist.extend(list2)

assert(newlist == [1, 2, 3, 4, 5])
share|improve this answer

Python 3.5 alternative:

Even though this is an old answer, another alternative has been introduced via the acceptance of PEP 448 which deserves mentioning.

The PEP, titled Additional Unpacking Generalizations, generally reduced some syntactic restrictions when using the starred * expression in Python; with it, joining two lists (applies to any iterable) can now also be done with:

>>> l1 = [1, 2, 3]
>>> l2 = [4, 5, 6]

#unpack both iterables in a list literal
>>> joinedList = [*l1, *l2]
>>> print(joinedList)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

This functionality was defined for Python 3.5; from testing it in 3.4 I don't belive it has been backported to previous versions in the 3.x family. In unsupported versions a SyntaxError is going to be raised.


The upside to this approach is that you really don't need lists in order to perform it, anything that is iterable will do. As stated in the PEP:

This is also useful as a more readable way of summing iterables into a list, such as my_list + list(my_tuple) + list(my_range) which is now equivalent to just [*my_list, *my_tuple, *my_range].

So while addition with + would raise a TypeError due to type mismatch:

 l = [1, 2, 3] + range(4, 7)

The following won't:

 l = [*[1, 2, 3], *range(4, 7)]

because it will first unpack the contents of the iterables and then simply create a list from the contents.

share|improve this answer

As a more general way for more lists you can put them within a list and use itertools.chain.from_iterable()1 function which based on THIS answer is the best way for flatting a nested list :

>>> l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
>>> import itertools
>>> list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(l))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9] 

1. Note that chain.from_iterable() is available in python =>2.6.In other versions use chain(*l)

share|improve this answer

Joining two lists in Python:

>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> b = [1, 4, 6, 7]
>>> c = a + b 
>>> c
[1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 4, 6, 7]

If you don't want any duplication :

>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
>>> b = [5, 6, 7, 8]
>>> c = list(set(a + b)) 
>>> c
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
share|improve this answer

You could use the append() method defined on list objects:

mergedlist =[]
for elem in listone:
    mergedlist.append(elem)
for elem in listtwo:
    mergedlist.append(elem)
share|improve this answer
5  
just so you know, if this is what you're doing in practice, this is much, much slower than the other proposed methods. see stackoverflow.com/questions/17479361/… – Ryan Haining Jul 16 '13 at 2:10
list1 = [1,2,3]
list2 = [4,5,6]

joinedlist = list1 + list2
#output : [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

Yes, its that simple.

list1 + list2. This gives a new list that is the concatenation of list1 and list2

share|improve this answer

As already pointed out by many, itertools.chain() is the way to go if one needs to apply exactly the same treatment to both lists. In my case, I had a label and a flag which were different from one list to the other, so I needed something slightly more complex. As it turns out, behind the scenes itertools.chain() simply does the following:

for it in iterables:
    for element in it:
        yield element

(see https://docs.python.org/2/library/itertools.html), so I took inspiration from here and wrote something along these lines:

for iterable, header, flag in ( (newList, 'New', ''), (modList, 'Modified', '-f')):
    print header + ':'
    for path in iterable:
        [...]
        command = 'cp -r' if os.path.isdir(srcPath) else 'cp'
        print >> SCRIPT , command, flag, srcPath, mergedDirPath
        [...]

The main points to understand here are that lists are just a special case of iterable, which are objects like any other; and that for ... in loops in python can work with tuple variables, so it is simple to loop on multiple variables at the same time.

share|improve this answer
list(set(listone) | set(listtwo))

The above code, does not preserve order, removes duplicate from each list (but not from the concatenated list)

share|improve this answer

protected by jamylak Apr 14 '13 at 10:35

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.