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How do I merge two lists in Python?

Example:

listone = [1,2,3]
listtwo = [4,5,6]

Outcome we expect:

mergedlist == [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
share|improve this question
1  
what about if listone was [3,2,1]? Will the output change? –  barkmadley Nov 12 '09 at 7:06
13  
"Just as it sounds" - it could have meant [1, 4, 2, 5, 3, 6]. –  Daniel Earwicker Nov 12 '09 at 7:39
2  
Ref. Stack Overflow podcast, episode 1, 14 min 16 secs. –  Peter Mortensen Dec 22 '13 at 9:25
4  
Could have found answer in any Python reference or tutorial. Personally I don't mind, but this question looks like asked solely for reputation mining ;) –  Clergyman Feb 8 at 12:46
    
'merge' as 'create one shallow-copy', 'deep-copy' or 'iterate from'? (@Clergyman, it's not at all that trivial) –  smci Sep 12 at 3:31

11 Answers 11

up vote 721 down vote accepted

Python makes this ridiculously easy.

mergedlist = listone + listtwo
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13  
does this create a deep copy of listone and appends listtwo? –  Daniel F Apr 19 '12 at 12:34
33  
@Daniel it will create a new list with a shallow copy of the items in the first list, followed by a shallow copy of the items in the second list. Use copy.deepcopy to get deep copies of lists. –  Daniel G Apr 19 '12 at 14:51
17  
another useful detail here: listone += listtwo results in listone == [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6] –  br1ckb0t Jan 29 at 16:14
4  
@br1ckb0t will that change what listone is pointing at? So:list3 = listone listone+=listtwo Is list3 changed as well? –  MikeH Feb 19 at 5:01
3  
it does change list3. However, if that isn't a problem, it's simpler more readable to add the two lists instead of creating a new one. –  br1ckb0t Feb 20 at 18:55

It's also possible to create a generator that simply iterates over the items in both lists. This allows you to chain lists (or any iterable) together for processing without copying the items to a new list:

import itertools
for item in itertools.chain(listone, listtwo):
   # do something with each list item
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8  
This is better way because it also works with numpy array. –  d.putto Sep 25 '12 at 9:37
1  
will this work the same way: mergedList = itertools.chain(listone, listtwo) for item in mergedList: –  yourfriendzak Mar 1 '13 at 0:55
3  
@d.putto: individual item access is very slow for numpy arrays (each access requires to convert the raw memory with a C type to Python object. Vectorized operations such as np.dot() work on the C types directly without the round trip to Python and therefore fast). You could use merged = np.r_[a, b] to get concatenated numpy array. –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 30 at 3:38

You can use sets to obtain merged list of unique values

mergedlist = list(set(listone + listtwo))
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28  
this will lose ordering information. –  aaronasterling Sep 20 '10 at 8:45
10  
True, however, it will also remove duplicates, if that's what you are interested in. List addition along would not do that. –  metasoarous Aug 21 '12 at 0:28
2  
Better than listone + [x for x in listtwo if x not in listone] –  Natim Jan 29 '13 at 13:13
1  
If I had a list of lists, such as this one: [[0, 5], [1, 10], [0, 7], [3, 5]] How would you merge them to avoid duplicates in the key (first value in each sub-list), but if they are duplicates, end up with the sum of the second values? Like so: [[0, 12], [1, 10], [3, 5]] Thanks –  jslvtr Jul 23 '13 at 12:24
2  
+1 IMHO this is the correct way to "merge" (union) lists while the "approved" answer describes how to combine/add lists (multiset) –  alfasin Apr 27 at 4:07

This is quite simple, I think it was even shown in the tutorial:

>>> listone = [1,2,3]
>>> listtwo = [4,5,6]
>>>
>>> listone + listtwo
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
share|improve this answer

You could also do

listone = [1,2,3]
listtwo = [4,5,6]
mergedlist = []
mergedlist.extend(listone)
mergedlist.extend(listtwo)
share|improve this answer
    
@MatthewPurdon extend won't take a single item, it expects a list. –  mateor Oct 15 at 21:43

You could simply use the + or += operator as follows:

a = [1, 2, 3]
b = [4, 5, 6]

c = a + b

Or:

c = []
a = [1, 2, 3]
b = [4, 5, 6]

c += (a + b)

Also, if you want the values in the merged list to be unique you can do:

c = list(set(a + b))
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It's worth noting that the itertools.chain function accepts variable number of arguments:

>>> l1 = ['a']; l2 = ['b', 'c']; l3 = ['d', 'e', 'f']
>>> [i for i in itertools.chain(l1, l2)]
['a', 'b', 'c']
>>> [i for i in itertools.chain(l1, l2, l3)]
['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f']

If an iterable (tuple, list, generator, etc.) is the input, the from_iterable class method may be used:

>>> il = [['a'], ['b', 'c'], ['d', 'e', 'f']]
>>> [i for i in itertools.chain.from_iterable(il)]
['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f']
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If you need to merge two ordered lists with complicated sorting rules, you might have to roll it yourself like in the following code (using a simple sorting rule for readability :-) ).

list1 = [1,2,5]
list2 = [2,3,4]
newlist = []

while list1 and list2:
    if list1[0] == list2[0]:
        newlist.append(list1.pop(0))
        list2.pop(0)
    elif list1[0] < list2[0]:
        newlist.append(list1.pop(0))
    else:
        newlist.append(list2.pop(0))

if list1:
    newlist.extend(list1)
if list2:
    newlist.extend(list2)

assert(newlist == [1, 2, 3, 4, 5])
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You could use the append() method

mergedlist =[]
for elem in listone:
    mergedlist.append(elem)
for elem in listtwo:
    mergedlist.append(elem)
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4  
just so you know, if this is what you're doing in practice, this is much, much slower than the other proposed methods. see stackoverflow.com/questions/17479361/… –  Ryan Haining Jul 16 '13 at 2:10

With Python 3.3+ you can use yield from:

listone = [1,2,3]
listtwo = [4,5,6]

def merge(l1, l2):
    yield from l1
    yield from l2

>>> list(merge(listone, listtwo))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

Or, if you want to support an arbitrary number of iterators:

def merge(*iters):
    for it in iters:
        yield from it

>>> list(merge(listone, listtwo, 'abcd', [20, 21, 22]))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 20, 21, 22]
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If you have two lists returned from a function you could do something like this:

def test():
    return [1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6]

result = list.__add__(*test())
print(result)

>>> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
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protected by jamylak Apr 14 '13 at 10:35

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