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I am unable to get emacs version 24.3 to indent two whitespaces when I hit the tab key in fundamental mode. I've read a number of other posts, such as set 4 Space Indent in Emacs. I'm pretty sure this used to work in older emacs versions:

(setq tab-width 2)
(setq indent-tabs-mode nil)

I'm now trying all this:

(setq tab-width 2)
(setq-default tab-width 2)
(setq indent-tabs-mode nil)
(setq-default indent-tabs-mode nil)
(setq indent-line-function 'insert-tab)
(setq tab-stop-list (number-sequence 2 400 2))

Now I find that tab is indenting to go right after the first white space block in the line

this is my first line
     second line starts here

I can't figure out how to get it to simple to

this is my first line
  second line starts here

Maybe the problem is my configuration? I have installed this new version of emacs in my own user home directory - it is not system wide version of emacs.

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I think the fundamental-mode-hook is broken -- this should have worked, but it doesn't -- sorry: stackoverflow.com/questions/69934/… –  lawlist Jun 20 '13 at 2:34
    
Fundamental mode inherits text-mode hooks . . . hmmm. –  lawlist Jun 20 '13 at 2:47
    
lawlist: fundamental-mode-hook isn't broken; it (intentionally) doesn't exist. –  phils Jun 20 '13 at 3:07
    
Ah . . . that explains it -- thank you. Is the only option then to manually call the function setting tab sets after entering fundamental mode? –  lawlist Jun 20 '13 at 3:14
1  
You could use after-change-major-mode-hook which will be run. e.g. (add-hook 'after-change-major-mode-hook (lambda () (when (eq major-mode 'fundamental-mode) ...))) –  phils Jun 20 '13 at 3:16

2 Answers 2

Actually, your "I'm now trying all this" config works just fine:

(setq-default tab-width 2)
(setq-default indent-tabs-mode nil)
(setq indent-line-function 'insert-tab)
(setq tab-stop-list (number-sequence 2 400 2))

If you reduce your init file to this, it should work as desired.

You may be clobbering the settings elsewhere in your config?

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That is working - in fact my whole .emacs file is working now. What I was doing to test this was –  David Jun 20 '13 at 16:49
    
That is working - in fact my whole .emacs file is working now. What I was doing to test this was emacs -Q to bypass my .emacs file, and then creating a small file jnk.el with a few of the commands in it. If jnk.el is the above commands and I run M-x eval-buffer on it, then it does not work. If I run M-x load-file on jnk.el, it doesn't work. But if My current buffer is my text file (in fundamental mode) and I do M-x load-file on jnk.el, then the commands in jnk.el DO start applying to text file! Is this unexpected? Thanks for the help, I'm past this frustration now. –  David Jun 20 '13 at 17:18
    
I suspect you're just getting confused by pre-existing buffer-local values. The above commands will set defaults (as the first two vars are automatically buffer-local, but the second two are not), but if you are evaluating/loading the code after starting Emacs, existing buffers will already have their own local values. –  phils Jun 20 '13 at 22:23

The first thing to do if you want to change the behavior "when I hit " is to do C-h k <foo>. That will tell you which command is run, and might give you some further hints about how to change its behavior. The behavior of the TAB key depends on the major mode, so making it do what you want depends on the major mode you're using. If you're using fundamental-mode, you'renot using Emacs in the normal way, so I'd recommend you try and fix that first.

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