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I'm trying to do a bottom gradient that goes from the right to the left. While I have this working, it makes no sense to me and weird things happen with tiny changes.

Gives the right gradient from right to left

-webkit-border-image: -webkit-gradient( linear, 100% 100%, 0 0, from( #000000 ), to( #ffffff) ) 0 0 100% 0;
border-bottom-width: 5px;

This puts the gradient in the background of the DIV?!

-webkit-border-image: -webkit-gradient( linear, 100% 100%, 0 0, from( #000000 ), to( #ffffff) ) 0 0 0 0;
border-bottom-width: 5px;

Here's what I understand and what I don't:

From the spec, it says the pieces:

-webkit-border-image: <function> <top> <right> <bottom> <left>

mean this:

<top> The distance from the top edge of the image.
<right> The distance from the right edge of the image.
<bottom> The distance from the bottom edge of the image.
<left>  The distance from the left edge of the image.

So, that means my first one 0 0 100% 0 should have the border-image (i.e. the gradient) 100% away from the bottom! But it does the opposite. Instead, that's the only one that shows the bottom border gradient, so it's really 0 away from the bottom.

And why does setting 0 for all those values make the gradient become the background of the div? In fact, if the div has a background-color, setting the border-image's top, right, bottom and left all to 0 will draw the border gradient over the background color!

How does this all work?

working example (you can alter it for different values)

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8" />
        <title>Abbott RealTime</title>
        <style>
            .test
            {
                position: relative;
                top: 0px;
                left: 0px;
                width: 300px;
                height: 200px;
                margin:0;
                padding:0;
                border:0;
                outline:0;
                font-size:100%;
                vertical-align:baseline;
                background:transparent;
                background-color: #ffcc33;
                /* This shows the bottom border properly */
                -webkit-border-image: -webkit-gradient( linear, 100% 100%, 0 0, from( #000000 ), to( #ffffff) ) 0 0 100% 0;

                /* This one would show the gradient in the background and the border as the background color! */
                /*-webkit-border-image: -webkit-gradient( linear, 100% 100%, 0 0, from( #000000 ), to( #ffffff) ) 0 0 100% 0;*/

                border-bottom-width: 5px;
            }
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div class="test">test</div
    </body>
</html>
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1 Answer 1

What you got wrong from the spec is that you assume that -webkit-border-image will "cut" a hole in your supplied image (at the end, your supplied gradient is being used as an image) . That is, that once you cut the image in 9 pieces (it gets cutted in 3 horizontally and in 3 vertically), the corners will be used in the corners, the edges in the edges, and the central piece discarded.

This is wrong. The central piece will be used in the center; and if you don't want to get the background over-written it's your responsability to get that transparent.

About your comment, I have prepared a demo so that it can be seen what happens. Both of your examples are limit ones, in the demo I have set a background that makes more easy see what happens. It is shown at the right as a reference. And i the middle, you go from 100% to 0% in a transition

Added demo

.test1 {
    left: 0px;
      /* This shows the bottom border properly */
    -webkit-border-image: linear-gradient(45deg, black, transparent, red) 0% 0% 100% 0%;
}

.test2 {
    left: 320px;

/* This one would show the gradient in the background and the border as the background color! */

    -webkit-border-image: linear-gradient(45deg, black, transparent, red) 0% 0% 0% 0%;
    -webkit-transition: all 5s;
}
.test2:hover {
    left: 320px;
    -webkit-border-image: linear-gradient(45deg, black, transparent, red) 0% 0% 100% 0%;
}

.bg {
    left: 640px;
    background: linear-gradient(45deg, black, transparent, red);
}

More specifically, this percentage specifies what part of the background image is taken for the bottom part. If you specify 100%, all your image is taken for the bottom. (And no image is left for the middle and upper parts). You can see how the gradient compresses there. If you specify 0%, none of your image is taken for the bottom part.

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OK, so how does 100% distance from the bottom result in the image showing at the bottom? (I'm still confused) –  Don Rhummy Jun 20 '13 at 20:58

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