Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Currently I have lots of tests that are blamed to not catch bugs at all. I want to do permutation testing, but preferably without modification of the source code (since the code base is huge).

I thought that generally it could be, that I inject a one-bit error somewhere in the elf binary, at a random place, and get stats from the tests (I would ignore crashes and count only reported failures) Assuming that tests run quickly, and the number of runs is big enough (~1M, ~1k ??), I should get a rough estimate of the hit rate of potential bugs??

share|improve this question
    
The key point on testing WHAT is to be tested. Some code would help! –  fiscblog Jun 20 '13 at 9:00
add comment

1 Answer 1

Assuming that tests run quickly, and the number of runs is big enough (~1M, ~1k ??), I should get a rough estimate of the hit rate of potential bugs??

No. Your "one-bit error somewhere in the elf binary" could corrupt anything (from elf format to data segments to call stacks and so on). You will not get any rough estimates on the number of bugs that way, but a rough estimate of the chances of a corrupted executable to execute (which says nothing about your application at all).

Currently I have lots of tests that are blamed to not catch bugs at all.

This is something you will have to address directly, and there are no shortcuts for it: you will have to establish new goals for your tests, refactor code to support them and implement them.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.