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Suppose a client has an object of a class, and this class has changed to new state. If that class calls to a previous state, what will happen?

Example:

I have written one class as follows

Class Old{
int a;
}

Suppose I have created new object of Class Old. I have serialized this object as well. Then, I change the Old class as follows:

Class Old{
int a;
int b;
}

What will happen if I try to unserialize the object with new Old Class?

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Since the client is holding a reference to the object it will always access the current object and its current state. Instances of a class are not stateful in the sense that they become stale or invalid.

A change to an instance of a class in one place will be accessible to all classes that reference that instance.

This example illustrates the points made above, since classes State,B,C all contain an instance of A, which points to the same spot in memory, aka: reference. When class B changes the state of A the change is made to the instance in memory that classes State,B,C refer to.

Don't think of it as C changed A so now all of the instances of A are updated. Think of it more like now everyone points to the updated object.

Here is a really simple real life example. Lets say I give all my friends permission to edit my LinkedIn profile. Consider my LinkedIn profile as 'A'. When all my friends view my profile (A), they see my title as Web application developer. Now, if one of my friends (B) accesses my profile and changes my title to Hobo (field), all of my friends (A,B,C) will see the new title. Why wouldn't my other friends (State,C) see, "Web Application Developer" as my title (field)? Its because there is one instance of my profile (A) and the same profile is viewed or updated by anyone with access to it.

public class State {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        A a = new A();
        B b = new B(a);
        C c = new C(a);

        System.out.println(a.field); //0
        System.out.println(b.a.field); //0
        System.out.println(c.a.field); //0

        b.change();

        System.out.println(a.field); //3
        System.out.println(b.a.field); //3
        System.out.println(c.a.field); //3

    }
}

class A{
    public Integer field = 0;
}

class B{
    public A a;

    public B(A a){
        this.a = a;
    }

    public void change(){
        this.a.field = 3;
    }
}

class C{
    public A a;

    public C(A a){
        this.a = a;
    }
}
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what happened if old instance is serialized and deserialized with new class? – Harikumar A Jun 26 '13 at 4:44

AS mentioned by Kevin "Since the client is holding a reference to the object it will always access the current object and its current state."

But if you are using RMI and serialization then there can be deserilization problems when you have a version mismatch betwween the class you have and the serialized bytes. Java recognizes if the bytes you want to deserialize match the local class version. If not it will throw an exception. SerialVersionId is the unique identifier for the class, used for serialization.

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