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I need to obtain new instances of some abstract type, and the two things that come to my mind is abstract factory and cloning smart pointer. Which one looks better? Factory method seems more universal, but overly verbose, especially when when the abstract objects are nested. Cloning pointer is more compact, but seems a bit ugly to be because we need to create a "dummy" object used as a template to create other objects.

class IObject {
public:
    virtual ~IObject() {}
};

class Foo: public IObject {
public:
    struct Config {};
    explicit Foo(const Config& config): config_(config) {}

private:
    Config config_;
};

Abstract factory:

class IObjectFactory {
public:
    virtual ~IObjectFactory() {}
    virtual std::unique_ptr<IObject> Create() const = 0;
};

class FooFactory: public IObjectFactory {
public:
    explicit FooFactory(const Foo::Config& config): config_(config) {}

    std::unique_ptr<IObject> Create() const {
        return std::unique_ptr<IObject>(new Foo(config_));
    }

private:
    Foo::Config config_;
};

void DoSomething(const std::shared_ptr<IObjectFactory>& factory) {
    std::vector<std::shared_ptr<IObject>> objects;
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
        objects.push_back(factory->Create());
    }
    // Do something with the created objects
}

int main() {
    auto factory = std::make_shared<FooFactory>(Foo::Config());
    DoSomething(factory);
}

Clone pointer (one of the implementations):

template <typename T> class clone_ptr; // deep cloning smart pointer

void DoSomething(const clone_ptr<IObject>& object) {
    std::vector<clone_ptr<IObject>> objects;
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
        objects.push_back(object);
    }
    // Do something with the created objects
}

int main() {
    clone_ptr<IObject> object(new Foo(Foo::Config()));
    DoSomething(object);
}
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1 Answer 1

The simpler thing to do is something you haven´t provided as an option. Add a virtual clone function to your base object and use that to clone the objects.

I don't quite see how the two approaches you have provided tackle the same problem... the pointer approach is complicated to get right, the smart pointer will have to do magic to track which is the real type that is stored internally to be able to clone (think magic as type erasure). The factory as shown above requires that you know the type that you want to clone.

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