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I know enough Haskell to translate the code below, but I don't know much about making it perform well:

typedef unsigned long precision;
typedef unsigned char uc;

const int kSpaceForByte = sizeof(precision) * 8 - 8;
const int kHalfPrec = sizeof(precision) * 8 / 2;

const precision kTop = ((precision)1) << kSpaceForByte;
const precision kBot = ((precision)1) << kHalfPrec;


//This must be called before encoding starts
void RangeCoder::StartEncode(){
  _low = 0;
  _range = (precision) -1;
}

/*
  RangeCoder does not concern itself with models of the data.
  To encode each symbol, you pass the parameters *cumFreq*, which gives
  the cumulative frequency of the possible symbols ordered before this symbol,
  *freq*, which gives the frequency of this symbol. And *totFreq*, which gives
  the total frequency of all symbols.
  This means that you can have different frequency distributions / models for
  each encoded symbol, as long as you can restore the same distribution at
  this point, when restoring.
*/
void RangeCoder::Encode(precision cumFreq, precision freq, precision totFreq){
  assert(cumFreq + freq <= totFreq && freq && totFreq <= kBot);
  _low += cumFreq * (_range /= totFreq);
  _range *= freq;
  while ((_low ^ _low + _range) < kTop or
         _range < kBot and ((_range= -_low & kBot - 1), 1)){
    //the "a or b and (r=..,1)" idiom is a way to assign r only if a is false.
    OutByte(_low >> kSpaceForByte); //output one byte.
    _range <<= sizeof(uc) * 8;
    _low <<= sizeof(uc) * 8;
  }
}

I know, I know "Write several versions and use criterion to see what works". I don't know enough to know what my options are though, or to avoid silly mistakes.

Here are my thoughts so far. One way would be to use the State monad and/or lenses. Another would be to translate the loop and state to explicit recursion. I read somewhere that explicit recursion tends to performs badly on ghc though. I think using ByteString Builder would be a good way to output each byte. Assuming I run on a 64 bit platform, should I use unboxed Word64 arguments? The compression quality will not decrease significantly if I decrease the precision to 32 bits. Will GHC optimize better for this?

Since this is not a 1-1 mapping, pipes with StateP would lead to very neat code, where I would request arguments one at a time and then let the while-loop respond byte for byte. Unfortunately, when i benchmarked it, it seems the pipe overhead (unsurprisingly) is quite large. Since each symbol can lead to many byte outputs, it feels a bit like a concatMap with State. Perhaps this would be the idiomatic solution? Concatenating lists of bytes does not sound very fast to me, though. ByteString has a concatMap. Perhaps this is the correct way? EDIT: no it is not. It takes a ByteString as input.

I intend to release the package on Hackage when I'm done, so any advice (or actual code!) you can give will benefit the community :). I plan to use this compression as a base for writing a very memory efficient compressed map.

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Please reformat the code to fit question column width. –  leventov Jun 20 '13 at 12:07
    
Only the comment sticks out I think, but I'll fix! –  Gurgeh Jun 20 '13 at 12:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I read somewhere that explicit recursion tends to performs badly on ghc though.

No. GHC produce slow machine code for recursion, which couldn't be reduced (or GHC "don't want" to reduce). If recursion could be unrolled (I don't see any fundamential problems with it in your snippet), it is translated to almost the same machine code as while-loop in C or C++.

Assuming I run on a 64 bit platform, should I use unboxed Word64 arguments? The compression quality will not decrease significantly if I decrease the precision to 32 bits. Will GHC optimize better for this?

Do you mean Word#? Let GHC to deal with it, use boxed types. I've never met a situation when some profit could be achived only by using unboxed types. Using 32bit types wouldn't help on 64bit platform.

One general rule of optimizing performance for GHC is avoiding data structures where possible. If you can pass pieces of data through function arguments or closures, use the chance.

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1  
I'd also mention strictness annotations (bang patterns) and avoiding excessive thunks –  jozefg Jun 20 '13 at 12:55
    
@jozefg yes, it is a technique of helping GHC to perform well. stackoverflow.com/questions/16926717/unboxing-a-function –  leventov Jun 20 '13 at 13:01
    
Aren't unboxed vectors significantly faster than their boxed equivalent? –  DiegoNolan Jun 20 '13 at 15:20
    
@DiegoNolan vectors are faster. I'm speaking about scalar values –  leventov Jun 20 '13 at 15:21
1  
What do you mean by avoiding data structures? Is three separate Word arguments better than a single record (let's say SymbolFreq) with three WordS? Would the same apply if I just send a list with [SymbolFreq] to encode? Would [(Word, Word, Word)] be different? –  Gurgeh Jun 21 '13 at 10:39

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