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I have a table that references files in a shared location on our network (stores the file path in the database).

I have a button that needs to delete the record from the database and the file off the File System:

foreach (var report in reports)
{
      string filePath = report.ReportPath;

      if (File.Exists(filePath));
      {
         File.Delete(filePath);
      }                      

      context.ReportGenerations.DeleteObject(report);
      context.SaveChanges();
}

An exception could be thrown when deleting the file or deleting the database record and if this happens I would like neither of the operations to complete.

Is there an easy way to ensure both operations are carried out successfully?

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2  
You could wrap the code on a database transaction.... –  Ioannis Karadimas Jun 20 '13 at 12:48
5  
A database transaction won't roll back the deletion of the file. –  venerik Jun 20 '13 at 12:51
    
well, yes, but if the db delete AND the file delete both succeed, then you wont have to rollback the transaction. check @Claudio's answer below. –  Ioannis Karadimas Jun 20 '13 at 12:52
1  
Does deleting the record and the file have to be atomic for all reports? –  Tim B Jun 20 '13 at 13:05
1  
Is the goal transaction synchronicity or eventual consistency? In other words, is it okay that there may be a short period where only one or the two items (db record, file) exists? If so, you might consider an asynchronous process like a periodic file purge job. –  neontapir Jun 20 '13 at 17:52
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5 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You have to do 2 two things

  • Wrap the whole process inside a database transaction.

  • Delete file from database before doing it from file system

If the process fails deleting from database, physical file won't be removed as you haven't reached file system delete logic.

If the process fails deleting from file system you rollback transaction and database operation is reverted.

DbTransaction transaction = null;
foreach (var report in reports)
{
    try
    {
        transaction = context.Connection.BeginTransaction();

        context.ReportGenerations.DeleteObject(report);
        context.SaveChanges();

        string filePath = report.ReportPath;
        if (File.Exists(filePath));
        {
            File.Delete(filePath);
        }
        transaction.Commit();
    }
    catch
    {
        transaction.Rollback();
    }
}        


While I believe this is the safer approach you can implement wihout getting really complex I agree that there is no synchronous approach that guarantee 100% of efficacy. To be sure that no orphan item remains, you'll have to implement a background clean up process. You'll have to analyze if such an extra complexity is justified or not according your scenario.

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The 2nd item does not apply. What would happen if the file 's locked, the network's unavailable, etc etc? –  Ioannis Karadimas Jun 20 '13 at 12:50
2  
It does matter: If you did the file first, and then the database call failed, how do you "rollback" the file delete? If you do database call first, you can roll it back if you find out that deleting the file failed. –  mellamokb Jun 20 '13 at 12:52
    
Yes, I now see I got it wrong: I thought it was "either - or", where it was both things. My mistake. –  Ioannis Karadimas Jun 20 '13 at 12:55
1  
This still isn't foolproof; what happens if transaction.Commit() fails? That seems just as likely as failing to delete a file from the filesystem. –  David Jun 20 '13 at 17:02
    
@Claudio thanks for a great answer...as a small aside you need to ensure the connection is open before assigning it to the transaction –  woggles Jun 21 '13 at 11:08
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Delete the file from database and file system in a transaction:

using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope(TransactionScope.Required, 
 new TransactionOptions 
     { IsolationLevel = IsolationLEvel.ReadCommitted}))
{
   try 
   {
       // Delete file from database
       // Delete physical file 
       // commit
   }
   catch (Exception ex)
   {
       // no commit, so database deletion will be rolled back
   }       
}

If the deletion of the file on a physical drive fails for some reason, the database deletion will be rolled back too.

If the deletion in the database failed, the file won't be deleted physically.

Commit is only executed if both physical delete and database delete has succeeeded.

So whatever exception might occur; you end up in a consistent state.

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I know. :) I just wanted to see the catch clause for consistnecy 's sake. –  Ioannis Karadimas Jun 20 '13 at 13:00
    
Fail safe but this solution requires elevating the transaction to MSDTC –  qujck Jun 20 '13 at 13:04
    
Ok, but is this a problem if you get fail safe solution? –  L-Three Jun 20 '13 at 13:08
    
@L-Three not for me, but there's a mountain of SO questions relating to MSDTC. And this may not work on Azure. –  qujck Jun 20 '13 at 13:16
1  
Right... good to know, but TS does not mention azure... :) –  L-Three Jun 20 '13 at 13:17
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foreach (var report in reports)
{
      string filePath = report.ReportPath;
      string copyPath = @"C:\temp\tempFile.txt"
      try
      {
           if (File.Exists(filePath));
           {
              File.Copy(filePath, copyPath);
              File.Delete(filePath);
           }                      

           context.ReportGenerations.DeleteObject(report);
           context.SaveChanges();               
      }
      catch(Exception ex)
      {
           File.Copy(copyPath, filePath);
      }
      File.Delete(copyPath);
}

Instead of using .txt you can also use the FileInfo to get filePath extension if they will all be different, or Split on '.' and take split[1] value and append to the end of copyPath. Up to you

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I am missing a " after .txt –  David Scott Jun 20 '13 at 12:58
    
also missing the File.Copy(filePath, copyPath); in the try to populate the copyPath first. Sorry for missing things. –  David Scott Jun 20 '13 at 13:00
    
This method does not require MSDTC which is a good thing, but is not full proof e.g. the file copy back could fail. –  qujck Jun 20 '13 at 13:03
    
indeed, not fail proof –  L-Three Jun 20 '13 at 13:08
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.NET Transactional File Manager looks like it could be useful for what you are trying to do. The examples seem to indicate that you can tie a database operation and a file operation together into a single transaction. I have never used it, so I can't say for certain.

Edit: I looked at the source code, and this library does nothing special. For a delete transaction, it just does a copy, then delete, like some others have suggested here.

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The solution would be
1) Copy the file to other temp location and then delete.
2) On successful deletion,then delete the record from the DB.
3) If some exception thrown from the DB,copy back the file and delete the file from temp location.
4) If evrything is successful ,then clear the file from temp location.

share|improve this answer
    
-1: How would that be better than wrapping the code in a transaction? –  Ioannis Karadimas Jun 20 '13 at 12:57
    
What if the file is large? It could take a long time to copy, and you now have to consider free disk space, and whether the process is able to write to a temporary location. –  Tim B Jun 20 '13 at 13:03
    
This is not fail safe at all. The copy back to orignal location could fail. –  L-Three Jun 20 '13 at 13:06
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