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A peculiar problem.

The script does something on 'mousedown' then executes on either event 'keypress', 'focusout', 'keyup'.

The question is how do I kill two remaining events once one of them is executed.

I've tried $(document).off(), $(this).off('focusout'), and nothing works.

Any clues?

.on('mousedown', '.task-content', function() {
    // Make DIV Editable
})

.on('keypress', '.task-content', function (e) {
    if (e.which == 13 && !e.shiftKey) {
        // Update DIV content to DB
    }
})

.on('focusout', '.task-content', function() {
    // Update DIV content to DB
})

.on('keyup', '.task-content', function (e) {
    if (e.which == 27) {
    // Return DIV to previous state
  }
})
share|improve this question
1  
I don't understand what you're trying to do. Can you show the actual code you tried for canceling/unbinding the events? –  Mathletics Jun 20 '13 at 13:54
    
@Mathletics / I've edited the code a bit (those work fine BTW - it would be a long code to post). What specifically happens is that once I hit 'Enter' (keypress, 13) // focusout is still 'listening' and can be executed as well. See I want two other processes to be killed once one of them is used. –  October Eleven Jun 20 '13 at 13:58
    
I guess he wants to execute only 1 of the 3 handlers, the unbinding is not necessary. –  Balint Bako Jun 20 '13 at 13:58

1 Answer 1

Your code is working fine, maybe you might point a wrong selector.

$('.task-content').on('keypress', function (e) {
    if (e.which == 13 && !e.shiftKey) {
        // Update DIV content to DB
        alert("key press");
        $(this).off('focusout');
    }
})

$('.task-content').on('focusout', function () {
    // Update DIV content to DB
    alert("focus out ");
})

Check this JSFiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this. I just managed to do that, however I need to 'reuse' focusout once on 'mousedown' again. // In other words, it can't be killed for good. –  October Eleven Jun 20 '13 at 14:15
    
@October Using delegate will rebind it. –  Praveen Jun 20 '13 at 14:22
    
Isn't delegate superseded by .on()? –  October Eleven Jun 20 '13 at 14:28
    
@OctoberEleven Thanks for correcting my mistake, you can use .on() –  Praveen Jun 20 '13 at 14:30

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