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import qualified Data.MemoCombinators as Memo
import System.Environment

single = fib' 80000
  where fib' = Memo.integral fib''
        fib'' 0 = 0
        fib'' 1 = 1
        fib'' x = fib' (x-1) + fib' (x-2)

doubleFast = fib' 80000 + fib' 80000
  where fib' = Memo.integral fib''
        fib'' 0 = 0
        fib'' 1 = 1
        fib'' x = fib' (x-1) + fib' (x-2)

doubleSlow = g 80000 + g 80000
  where g x = fib' x
          where fib' = Memo.integral fib''
                fib'' 0 = 0
                fib'' 1 = 1
                fib'' x = fib' (x-1) + fib' (x-2)              

main = do
  args <- getArgs
  case args of
    ["single"]     -> print single
    ["doubleFast"] -> print doubleFast
    ["doubleSlow"] -> print doubleSlow 

./file single +RTS -s

yields

1,085,072,320 bytes allocated in the heap
387,297,448 bytes copied during GC
265,811,512 bytes maximum residency (10 sample(s))
99,107,440 bytes maximum slop
433 MB total memory in use (0 MB lost due to fragmentation)

Total   time    2.78s  (  2.78s elapsed)

./file doubleFast +RTS -s

yields the same result. This makes sense to me: Since fib' is in the scope of doubleFast, fib' is not discarded after calculating the first fib' 80000 and can be used to directly give the second fib' 80000.

What I do not understand is the following:

./file doubleSlow +RTS -s

2,166,532,752 bytes allocated in the heap
551,826,896 bytes copied during GC
263,793,848 bytes maximum residency (11 sample(s))
204,460,968 bytes maximum slop
818 MB total memory in use (0 MB lost due to fragmentation)

Total   time   14.22s  ( 14.24s elapsed)

Please correct me if I am wrong: fib' is used to calculate the first g 80000 = fib' 80000. The function g is left, and because g is not memorized, it cannot be reused to calculate the second g 80000 directly. Furthermore, after leaving the first call of g 80000 the lookup table of fib' is discarded because it is not in the scope of doubleSlow.

800 MB make sense to me, because the look up table has to be build twice. However, why does it take 14.22s compared to 2.78s? I expected roughly twice as much, approx. 5.8s.

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How much of the time is spent in GC? Did you compile with -O2? –  augustss Jun 20 '13 at 14:36

1 Answer 1

When compiling with optimisations, I get nearly identical figures for all three ways - fib' and fib'' are then hoisted to the top-level also for doubleSlow, as they are for the two others even without optimisation, so the difference is just a lookup, an addition of two large numbers, and the result of that addition for the doubleX vs. single.

When compiling without optimisations, doubleSlow takes about 4.5 times as long, and allocates roughly twice as much as the two others. The bulk of the difference is due to longer GC,

MUT     time    1.64s  (  1.64s elapsed)
GC      time    7.09s  (  7.10s elapsed)

MUT     time    0.75s  (  0.75s elapsed)
GC      time    1.07s  (  1.07s elapsed)

and the computation time (MUT) is about twice as long, which fits the fact that the lookup data structure is built twice (your reasoning is more or less correct, the lookup table is local to g, then, and g 80000 is called twice).

I'm not familiar enough with GHC's garbage collector to explain why collecting the first lookup table takes that long with the default settings, but the time it takes is very dependent on the size of the allocation area, I got the best results setting it to 3MB,

$ ./memfib +RTS -s -A3M -RTS doubleSlow > /dev/null
   2,166,534,656 bytes allocated in the heap
     599,670,152 bytes copied during GC
     161,411,104 bytes maximum residency (13 sample(s))
      99,163,664 bytes maximum slop
             414 MB total memory in use (0 MB lost due to fragmentation)

                                    Tot time (elapsed)  Avg pause  Max pause
  Gen  0       562 colls,     0 par    0.49s    0.49s     0.0009s    0.0041s
  Gen  1        13 colls,     0 par    0.62s    0.62s     0.0477s    0.0841s

  INIT    time    0.00s  (  0.00s elapsed)
  MUT     time    1.61s  (  1.62s elapsed)
  GC      time    1.11s  (  1.11s elapsed)
  EXIT    time    0.03s  (  0.03s elapsed)
  Total   time    2.76s  (  2.76s elapsed)

  %GC     time      40.2%  (40.2% elapsed)

  Alloc rate    1,343,022,682 bytes per MUT second

  Productivity  59.8% of total user, 59.7% of total elapsed

compared to

$ ./memfib +RTS -s -A3M -RTS doubleFast > /dev/null
   1,085,085,832 bytes allocated in the heap
     311,633,528 bytes copied during GC
     165,830,256 bytes maximum residency (9 sample(s))
      99,121,736 bytes maximum slop
             389 MB total memory in use (0 MB lost due to fragmentation)

                                    Tot time (elapsed)  Avg pause  Max pause
  Gen  0       280 colls,     0 par    0.22s    0.22s     0.0008s    0.0042s
  Gen  1         9 colls,     0 par    0.34s    0.34s     0.0376s    0.0792s

  INIT    time    0.00s  (  0.00s elapsed)
  MUT     time    0.79s  (  0.79s elapsed)
  GC      time    0.55s  (  0.56s elapsed)
  EXIT    time    0.03s  (  0.03s elapsed)
  Total   time    1.38s  (  1.38s elapsed)

  %GC     time      40.3%  (40.3% elapsed)

  Alloc rate    1,378,141,985 bytes per MUT second

  Productivity  59.7% of total user, 59.7% of total elapsed

it's almost exactly a factor of two.

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