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I'm writing my own kernel module which captures vfs_mkdir(struct inode *, struct dentry *, int) kernel function invocation and tries to log the on-disk pathname where this invocation occurs.

I want to use the dentry_path kernel function to convert struct dentry * to a pathname. It's wired that when I insert the module, I get an error

Unknown symbol dentry_path

My kernel version is 2.6.32 and it is supposed to be exported. I can't figure out the reason. Is there any alternatives?

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1 Answer 1

Use dentry_path_raw. dentry_path isn't exported.

From linux-fsdevel archives:

On Fri, Apr 20, 2012 at 02:08:37PM -0400, Theodore Ts'o wrote:

> I wonder if we would be better off simply exporting dentry_path(),
> perhaps as EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL, with a warning that it should only be used
> for debugging purposes, or some such.  I suspect it's not worth changing
> all of the inode_ops interfaces to pass in a struct path intead of a
> struct dentry if it's only to be used for debugging.  Or maybe I should
> just keep on doing these ugly things and justify them because it's only
> for debugging (yelch).
> 
> What do you think?

Just use dentry_path_raw() - it _is_ exported and the only difference is
the lack of //deleted for unlinked ones.
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Thanks, I tried this. But I didn't find the symbol dentry_path_raw in kernel version 2.6.32. Anything wrong with my configuration? –  Summer_More_More_Tea Jun 20 '13 at 15:11
    
nothing wrong; dentry_path_raw was added in 2.6.38 –  devnull Jun 20 '13 at 15:21
    
If you have control over the Linux build you could try updating the code to export it as you want. –  Benjamin Leinweber Jun 21 '13 at 14:25

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