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Now I'm not pretending that this code is good programming practice, but I don't understand why it won't compile. What's going on here?

object CustomTo extends App {
  val thing:Something = new Something
  val str:String = thing.to[String]
  println(str)
}

class Something {
  def to[String]:String = {
    "hello"
  }
}

Compiler output:

CustomTo.scala:9: error: type mismatch;
 found   : java.lang.String("hello")
 required: String
    "hello"
    ^
one error found
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2  
it's actually a very bad practice what you are doing here... You named your type parameter a String. just replace it with something like T and you will understand why it does not compile. –  tenshi Jun 20 '13 at 15:09
    
possible duplicate of Scala type parameter error, not a member of type parameter –  senia Jun 20 '13 at 15:12
    
Ah, how silly of me. –  tsjnsn Jun 20 '13 at 15:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You named your type parameter String instead of T, but that doesn't make it less abstract, it can still be anything.

def to[String]:String 
// is the same as
def to[T]:T

If you want to create a generic .to[T] function that returns hello when called with String, i.e. you want to pattern match on a type, you can use a TypeTag:

Edit: I just overlooked that the return type needs to be T, which means a useless cast has to be there, see below.

import reflect.runtime.universe._

def to[T : TypeTag] = (typeOf[T] match {
  case t if t =:= typeOf[String] => "hello"
  case t if t =:= typeOf[Int] => 1
  case _ => ???
}).asInstanceOf[T]

and:

scala> to[String]
res13: String = hello

scala> to[Int]
res14: Int = 1

scala> to[Double]
scala.NotImplementedError: an implementation is missing
...

I am not sure there is a way to have the compiler infer on its own that things inside the pattern match have the correct types. It may be possible with ClassTag, but you would lose type safety with .to[List[Int]] and similar...

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Accepted for reading my mind. Is there a way I can narrow the return type? val str:String = thing.to[String].asInstanceOf[String] Is it possible to return the requested type by default? –  tsjnsn Jun 20 '13 at 15:44
    
@tsjnsn good point, the return type isn't very nice. See my edit. –  gourlaysama Jun 20 '13 at 15:52
    
awesome, thanks! –  tsjnsn Jun 20 '13 at 16:49

The compiler expects "String", if you would have put

class Something {
  def to[T]:T = {
    "hello"
  }
}

You would get something like "required: T". In other words, you bind "String" to some type. There is not a lot of sense making in your example right now. What are you trying to accomplish?

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I wanted to be able to say something like thing.to[String] or thing.to[Int] , so a definition like this: (even though types cant be compared like I'm showing) def to[A]:A = { if (A == String) => "hello"; if (A == Int) => 0; } –  tsjnsn Jun 20 '13 at 15:21

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