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I'm a noob in Perl and I'm having a tough time getting this done. I have two single-columned CSV files, and I'm trying to print the differences to a third file.

File1:
123
124
125
126

File2:
123
124
127

Expected Output:
125
126
127

This is what I've got so far, which isn't working:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $sheet_1;
my $sheet_2;
my $count1 = 0;
my $count2 = 0;

my $file1 = 'file1.csv';
my $file2 = 'file2.csv';
my $file_out = 'output.csv';

open (FILE1, "<$file1")  or die "Couldn't open input file: $!"; 
open (FILE2, "<$file2")  or die "Couldn't open input file: $!"; 


while( <FILE1> ) {
  chomp;
  $count1++;
  #skip header;
  next unless $count1;
  my $row_1;
  @$row_1 = split( /,/, $_ );
  push @$sheet_1, $row_1;
}
@$sheet_1 = sort { $a->[0] <=> $b->[0] } @$sheet_1;

while( <FILE2> ) {
  chomp;
  $count2++;
  #skip header;
  next unless $count2;
  my $row_2;
  @$row_2 = split( /,/, $_ );
  push @$sheet_2, $row_2;
}

@$sheet_2 = sort { $a->[0] <=> $b->[0] } @$sheet_2;


OUTER: {
     foreach my $row_1 ( @$sheet_1 ) {
         foreach my $row_2 ( @$sheet_2 ) {
        if (@$row_1[0] eq @$row_2[0]){
        last OUTER
        }
        else{
        print "@$row_1[0]\n";
        }
        }
    }
}

close FILE1;
close FILE2;
share|improve this question
4  
Very early in my second (and current) career, I wrote some code very much like this. That's before I discovered diff. Take a look at man diff. –  Jack Maney Jun 20 '13 at 16:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the Text::Diff Perl module to do this. Otherwise, see below:

Here's one algorithm to do the comparison.

use strict;
my @arr1;
my @arr2;
my $a;

open(FIL,"a.txt") or die("$!");
while (<FIL>)
    {chomp; $a=$_; $a =~ s/[\t;, ]*//g; push @arr1, $a if ($a ne  '');};
close(FIL);

open(FIL,"b.txt") or die("$!");
while (<FIL>)
    {chomp; $a=$_; $a =~ s/[\t;, ]*//g; push @arr2, $a if ($a ne  '');};
close(FIL);

my %arr1hash;
my %arr2hash;
my @diffarr;
foreach(@arr1) {$arr1hash{$_} = 1; }
foreach(@arr2) {$arr2hash{$_} = 1; }

foreach $a(@arr1)
{
    if (not defined($arr2hash{$a})) 
     {
        push @diffarr, $a;
     }
}

foreach $a(@arr2)
{
   if (not defined($arr1hash{$a})) 
   { 
       push @diffarr, $a;
   }
}

print "Diff:\n";
foreach $a(@diffarr)
{
    print "$a\n";
}
# You can print to a file instead, by: print FIL "$a\n";
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Worked spot on! Had about 380k entries per file and it did not choke up my memory, thankfully.. –  Yoboy Jun 21 '13 at 8:05

Look at diff and comm. These may do what you want.

Now for a few questions:

  1. If these files have only a single value per row, what makes them CSV files? CSV files have multiple columns separated by commas (CSV = Comma Separated Values). Is there something else going on.
  2. If both files have the same value, but in two different places, do you count that as a diff? Imagine one file with three lines and the lines contain 1, 2, 3. You're comparing it against a second file with 1, 3, 2 in it. Do the second and third line differ? Or, are the files the same because they contain the same values?

Nope, if both files have the same value in different places, this value should not be in the output. In your example, the two files (1,2,3) and (1,3,2) are the same. – Yoboy 7 hours ago

Very well...

Whenever you have is item from group #1 in group #2 type of question, you should think of a hash.

A hash is a list of values where each value has a key. The can be duplicate values in your list, but only a single instance of a particular key. This means that you can easily see if a key in already in your list.

Imagine taking File #1, and putting each value as a key in a hash. It doesn't matter what the values are, you're merely interested in the keys.

Now, when you go through File #2, you can quickly see whether that key is already in your hash. If it is, it's a duplicate value.

We can also take advantage of the second feature of a hash: Only a single instance of a key is allowed. What if we throw both flies into a single hash? If a value is duplicated between File #1 and File #2, it doesn't matter, there can only be one instance of that key.

Here's a way to get a list of unique values in both files:

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw(say);
use autodie;

use constant {
    FILE_1  => "file1.txt",
    FILE_2  => "file2.txt",
};

my %hash;
#
# Load the Hash with value from File #1
#
open my $file1_fh, "<", FILE_1;
while ( my $value = <$file1_fh> ) {
    chomp $value;
    $hash{$value} = 1;
}
close $file1_fh;
#
# Add File #2 to the Hash
#
open my $file2_fh, "<", FILE_2;
while ( my $value = <$file2_fh> ) {
    chomp $value;
    $hash{$value} = 1;   #If that value was in "File #1", it will be "replaced"
}
close $file2_fh;

#
# Now print out everything
#
for my $value ( sort keys %hash ) {
    say $value;
}

This will print out:

123
124
125
126
127

What you want is a list of unique values. This is a bit trickier than it first seems. You can put the values of File #1 into a hash, and then print out the values in File #2 if they're not in File #1. This will give you a list of unique values in File #2, but not unique values in File #1.

Therefore, you need to create two hashes, one for FIle #1 and one for File #2, and then go through each and compare them against each other:

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw(say);
use autodie;

use constant {
    FILE_1  => "file1.txt",
    FILE_2  => "file2.txt",
};

#
# Load Hash #1 with value from File #1
#
my %hash1;
open my $file1_fh, "<", FILE_1;
while ( my $value = <$file1_fh> ) {
    chomp $value;
    $hash1{$value} = 1;
}
close $file1_fh;

#
# Load Hash #2 with value from File #2
#
my %hash2;
open my $file2_fh, "<", FILE_2;
while ( my $value = <$file2_fh> ) {
    chomp $value;
    $hash2{$value} = 1;
}
close $file2_fh;

Now, we need to compare one against the other. I'll store the values in an array for now:

my @array;
#
# Check if File #1 has unique values vs File #2
#
for my $value ( %keys %hash1 ) {
   if ( not exists $hash2{$value} ) {
      push @array, $value;  #Value in File #1, but not in File #2
   }
}
#
# Check if File #2 has unique values vs File #1
#
for my $value ( %keys %hash2 ) {
   if ( not exists $hash1{$value} ) {
      push @array, $value;  #Value in File #2, but not in File #1
   }
}
#
# Now print out what's in @array of unique values
#
for my $value ( sort @array ) {
    say $value;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply David. 1) Initially the files had multiple comma-separated columns, but I don't need them so I got rid of them. It doesn't have to be in CSV file anymore. 2) Nope, if both files have the same value in different places, this value should not be in the output. In your example, the two files (1,2,3) and (1,3,2) are the same. –  Yoboy Jun 21 '13 at 7:05
    
@Yoboy - See my answer above. –  David W. Jun 21 '13 at 14:50
  1. If it's single columned, there's no commas to split on. Why are you doing that? Just split the file on "\n"
  2. Don't reinvent the wheel. If it's an actual CSV with multiple columns, use something like Text::CSV::Slurp to read it
  3. You're Instead of looping over the entirety of each file when you look for items, use a hash to serve as a lookup. However, if you're dealing with large files, you may run into memory issues.

I.e.:

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.012;

use Text::CSV::Slurp;

my $file1_src=<<EOF;
id,field1,field2,field3
123,junk,"quoted junk",junk 
124,"quoted junk","quoted junk",junk 
125,junk,"quoted junk",junk 
126,junk,"quoted junk",junk 
EOF

my $file2_src=<<EOF;
id,field1,field2,field3
123,junk,"quoted junk",junk 
124,junk,"quoted junk",junk 
127,"quoted junk","quoted junk",junk
EOF

my %data1 = map { $_->{id} => 1 } @{Text::CSV::Slurp->load(string => $file1_src)};
my %data2 = map { $_->{id} => 1 } @{Text::CSV::Slurp->load(string => $file2_src)};

for my $id (keys %data1, keys %data2) {
  say $id unless $data1{$id} and $data2{$id};
}
share|improve this answer
    
You're right.. The file initially had several columns that I did not need, so I've got them removed. I'm still getting myself to know hash a little better, looks like I have a lot more reading to do! Thanks Oesor! :) –  Yoboy Jun 21 '13 at 8:08

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