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I've working with git for pretty long time and still can figure out that. I add some files, I delete some files... When I want to commit, what do I do?

#1
git add .
git commit -m "123"

or

#2
git rm file1_I_removed
git rm file2_I_removed
git rm file3_I_removed
git rm file4_I_removed
git add .
git commit -m "123"

or

#3

git add -u
git commit -m "123"

Note that most probably I don't remember exactly what files I have deleted (even thought I can use git status and see them), and once I've deleted them, I want them to be deleted from repository as well without trying hard like

git rm file1_I_removed 
git rm file2_I_removed ... 
git rm fileN_I_removed 
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

git add -u

This command deletes all removed files, and updates what was modified.

If you have new files to add to the commit after that you can always git add . after.

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1  
+1. Note: depending on what deletion you need to record in the index, you might want to consider git add -u . (git1.8.3+): see stackoverflow.com/a/2190440/6309 –  VonC Jun 20 '13 at 16:41
    
great note, thanks. –  Asier Aranbarri Jun 20 '13 at 18:34
1  
But what about git add -A .? –  Marius Kavansky Jun 21 '13 at 3:07
    
git add -A . will do both git add . and git add -u, in that order. Maybe he doesn't want to add anything and just wants to delete removed files, that's why I proposed a git add -u and then, if desired, git add . Anyway, good note, |1 –  Asier Aranbarri Jun 21 '13 at 7:41

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